bounce Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “bounce” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bounce" - American English Dictionary

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bounceverb [I/T]

 us   /bɑʊns/

bounce verb [I/T] (JUMP)

to move up or away after ​hitting a ​surface, or to ​cause something to move this way: [I] The ​basketball bounced off the ​rim of the ​basket. [T] She bounced the ​baby on her ​knee. [I] fig.Tom bounced into the ​room (= ​walked in a ​happy, ​energetic way).

bounce verb [I/T] (NOT PAY)

infml (of a ​check) to not be ​paid or ​accepted by a ​bank because of a ​lack of ​money in the ​account, or to ​pay with a ​check for which there is not enough ​money in the ​account: [T] He’s bounced ​checks before, but never on this ​account.

bouncenoun

 /bɑʊns/

bounce noun (JUMP)

[C] an ​occasion when something such as a ​ball moves up or away after ​hitting a ​surface: In ​tennis you must ​hit the ​ball before ​its second bounce. [U] the ​quality of being ​able to bounce: a ​ball that has ​lostits bounce
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bounce" - British English Dictionary

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bounceverb

uk   us   /baʊns/

bounce verb (JUMP)

B1 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​move up or away after ​hitting a ​surface: The ​ball bounced off the ​goalpost and into the ​net. She bounced the ​ballquickly. Her ​bag bounced (= ​moved up and down) against her ​side as she ​walked. The ​children had ​broken the ​bed by bouncing (= ​jumping up and down) on it. He bounced the ​baby (= ​lifted it up and down) on his ​knee.figurative Television ​pictures from all over the ​world are bounced offsatellites (= are ​sent to and ​returned from them).B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​move in an ​energetic and ​enthusiasticmanner: Tom bounced in, ​smilingbroadly.
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bounce verb (NOT PAY)

[I or T] informal to (​cause a cheque to) not be ​paid or ​accepted by a ​bank because there is no ​money in the ​account: I had to ​pay a ​penaltyfee when my ​cheque bounced. To my ​horror the ​bank bounced the ​cheque.

bounce verb (EMAIL)

C2 [I or T] If an ​email that you ​send bounces or is bounced, it comes back to you because the ​address is ​wrong or there is a ​computerproblem.

bouncenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /baʊns/
the ​act of bouncing, or the ​quality that makes something ​able to bounce: In ​tennis you have to ​hit the ​ball before ​its second bounce.figurative This ​shampoo will give ​yourhair bounce (= make it ​lookattractivelythick) and ​shine.
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bounce" - Business English Dictionary

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bounceverb [I or T]

uk   us   /baʊns/
BANKING if a ​cheque bounces, or a ​bank bounces it, the ​bankrefuses to ​pay it because there is not enough ​money in the ​account: The ​bank immediately ​froze the ​account and bounced ​outstandingcheques. Payments of $1 million were coming ​due, but when ​investors went to ​cash the ​checks, they bounced.
IT, COMMUNICATIONS if an ​email that you ​send bounces or is bounced, it is ​returned to you because the ​address is wrong or there is a ​computer problem: Customers may be annoyed that ​spamdefences bounce their ​legitimatee-mail. The ​report they'd ​asked me to ​send bounced, because the ​emailaddress was ​invalid.
FINANCE, ECONOMICS to suddenly ​increase, often after ​falling to its ​lowestlevel: Analysts say that the US ​economy has bounced.bounce 10%/10p/10 points The Group's ​shares bounced 20% yesterday as it ​unveiled its half-year ​results.

bouncenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /baʊns/
ECONOMICS, FINANCE a sudden ​increase in ​value, ​price, etc.: Dealers took their cue from a strong bounce on Wall Street to ​pushpriceshigher.a bounce in sth Confidence is ​growing that we will see a bounce in ​consumerspending. Today's ​recovery is being ​led by a bounce in the ​technologysector.a bounce back Despite a bounce back in ​prices after the ​sales, the ​volume of ​business in ​storesrose in August.
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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