bounce Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “bounce” - English Dictionary

Definition of "bounce" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

bounceverb [I/T]

 us   /bɑʊns/

bounce verb [I/T] (JUMP)

to move up or away after ​hitting a ​surface, or to ​cause something to move this way: [I] The ​basketball bounced off the ​rim of the ​basket. [T] She bounced the ​baby on her ​knee. [I] fig.Tom bounced into the ​room (= ​walked in a ​happy, ​energetic way).

bounce verb [I/T] (NOT PAY)

infml (of a ​check) to not be ​paid or ​accepted by a ​bank because of a ​lack of ​money in the ​account, or to ​pay with a ​check for which there is not enough ​money in the ​account: [T] He’s bounced ​checks before, but never on this ​account.

bouncenoun

 /bɑʊns/

bounce noun (JUMP)

[C] an ​occasion when something such as a ​ball moves up or away after ​hitting a ​surface: In ​tennis you must ​hit the ​ball before ​its second bounce. [U] the ​quality of being ​able to bounce: a ​ball that has ​lostits bounce
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bounce" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

bounceverb

uk   us   /baʊns/

bounce verb (JUMP)

B1 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​move up or away after ​hitting a ​surface: The ​ball bounced off the ​goalpost and into the ​net. She bounced the ​ballquickly. Her ​bag bounced (= ​moved up and down) against her ​side as she ​walked. The ​children had ​broken the ​bed by bouncing (= ​jumping up and down) on it. He bounced the ​baby (= ​lifted it up and down) on his ​knee.figurative Television ​pictures from all over the ​world are bounced offsatellites (= are ​sent to and ​returned from them).B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​move in an ​energetic and ​enthusiasticmanner: Tom bounced in, ​smilingbroadly.
More examples

bounce verb (NOT PAY)

[I or T] informal to (​cause a cheque to) not be ​paid or ​accepted by a ​bank because there is no ​money in the ​account: I had to ​pay a ​penaltyfee when my ​cheque bounced. To my ​horror the ​bank bounced the ​cheque.

bounce verb (EMAIL)

C2 [I or T] If an ​email that you ​send bounces or is bounced, it comes back to you because the ​address is ​wrong or there is a ​computerproblem.

bouncenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /baʊns/
the ​act of bouncing, or the ​quality that makes something ​able to bounce: In ​tennis you have to ​hit the ​ball before ​its second bounce.figurative This ​shampoo will give ​yourhair bounce (= make it ​lookattractivelythick) and ​shine.
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "bounce" - Business English Dictionary

See all translations

bounceverb [I or T]

uk   us   /baʊns/
BANKING if a ​cheque bounces, or a ​bank bounces it, the ​bankrefuses to ​pay it because there is not enough ​money in the ​account: The ​bank immediately ​froze the ​account and bounced ​outstandingcheques. Payments of $1 million were coming ​due, but when ​investors went to ​cash the ​checks, they bounced.
IT, COMMUNICATIONS if an ​email that you ​send bounces or is bounced, it is ​returned to you because the ​address is wrong or there is a ​computer problem: Customers may be annoyed that ​spamdefences bounce their ​legitimatee-mail. The ​report they'd ​asked me to ​send bounced, because the ​emailaddress was ​invalid.
FINANCE, ECONOMICS to suddenly ​increase, often after ​falling to its ​lowestlevel: Analysts say that the US ​economy has bounced.bounce 10%/10p/10 points The Group's ​shares bounced 20% yesterday as it ​unveiled its half-year ​results.

bouncenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /baʊns/
ECONOMICS, FINANCE a sudden ​increase in ​value, ​price, etc.: Dealers took their cue from a strong bounce on Wall Street to ​pushpriceshigher.a bounce in sth Confidence is ​growing that we will see a bounce in ​consumerspending. Today's ​recovery is being ​led by a bounce in the ​technologysector.a bounce back Despite a bounce back in ​prices after the ​sales, the ​volume of ​business in ​storesrose in August.
(Definition of bounce from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of bounce?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“bounce” in Business English

Word of the Day

chestnut

a large tree with leaves divided into five parts and large round nuts that can be eaten

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More