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Definition of “brief” - English Dictionary

"brief" in American English

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briefadjective [-er/-est only]

us   /brif/
lasting only a short time or containing few words: Rory had a brief career as an actor.

briefverb [T]

us   /brif/
  • brief verb [T] (GIVE INSTRUCTIONS)

to give someone instructions or information about what to do or say: He is briefing the account executives on the new airline accounts.
(Definition of brief from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"brief" in British English

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briefadjective

uk   /briːf/ us   /briːf/
  • brief adjective (SHORT IN TIME)

B1 lasting only a short time or containing few words: His acceptance speech was mercifully brief. I had a brief look at her report before the meeting. It'll only be a brief visit because we really don't have much time. After a brief spell/stint in the army, he started working as a teacher. The company issued a brief statement about yesterday's accident.
used to express how quickly time goes past: For a few brief weeks we were very happy.

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briefverb

uk   /briːf/ us   /briːf/
[T] to give someone detailed instructions or information: We had already been briefed about/on what the job would entail.
Compare
brief against/in favour of sb/sth
[I] UK to make information about someone or something public, with the intention of criticizing/praising him, her, or it: On several occasions government officials briefed against their own ministers.

briefnoun

uk   /briːf/ us   /briːf/
  • brief noun (INSTRUCTIONS)

[C] UK a set of instructions or information: [+ to infinitive] It was my brief to make sure that the facts were set down accurately.
[C] specialized law a document or set of documents containing the details about a court case
  • brief noun (LAWYER)

UK informal a lawyer who will speak for someone in a court of law : My brief advised me to plead guilty.
(Definition of brief from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"brief" in Business English

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briefnoun [C]

uk   /briːf/ us  
WORKPLACE instructions that explain what someone's work or task is: His brief was to streamline the group's financial services operation.give sb/prepare a brief We have prepared a brief for a full study by a consultant.
LAW a document that shows the facts of a legal case that will be argued by a lawyer in a court: to prepare/file/submit a brief

briefverb [T]

uk   /briːf/ us  
to give someone information about something: Managers were touring the US to brief investors on last week's interim results.
WORKPLACE to explain someone's work or task to them: It's my job to brief volunteers beforehand and explain what their responsibilities are.
LAW to tell a lawyer the facts of a legal case that he or she will argue in court
(Definition of brief from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“brief” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
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May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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