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Definition of “brush” - English Dictionary

"brush" in American English

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brushnoun

us   /brʌʃ/
  • brush noun (TOOL)

[C] any of various utensils consisting of hairs or fibers arranged in rows or grouped together, attached to a handle, and used for smoothing the hair, cleaning things, painting, etc.: I need a better brush for my hair.
[C] Brush is often used as a combining form: hairbrush toothbrush paintbrush
  • brush noun (BUSHES)

[U] low, dense bushes that grow on open land: The river banks were covered with brush.
  • brush noun (TOUCH)

[C usually sing] A brush with something or someone is a close and usually unpleasant meeting: The subway system has survived several brushes with bankruptcy.

brushverb

us   /brʌʃ/
  • brush verb (TOUCH)

[I/T] to touch something lightly: [T] A warm gust of wind brushed my cheek. [I] The cat brushed against my leg.
  • brush verb (TOOL)

[T] to remove or improve the appearance of something using your hand or a brush: She brushed a strand of hair from her face. She brushed her hair.
brush your teeth
To brush your teeth is to clean them using a small brush and toothpaste.
(Definition of brush from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"brush" in British English

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brushnoun

uk   /brʌʃ/ us   /brʌʃ/
  • brush noun (TOOL)

A2 [C] an object with short pieces of stiff hair, plastic, or wire attached to a base or handle, used for cleaning, arranging your hair, or painting: I can't find my brush, but I still have my comb. You'll need a stiff brush to scrape off the rust. a clothes brush a scrubbing (US scrub) brush a pastry brush
B2 [S] mainly UK an act of cleaning with a brush: These shoes need a good brush. Don't forget to give your hair a brush before you go out.

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  • brush noun (BUSHES)

[U] US small, low bushes or the rough land they grow on: We spotted a jackrabbit hidden in the brush. The dry weather has increased the risk of brush fires.
[U] US →  brushwood

brushverb

uk   /brʌʃ/ us   /brʌʃ/
  • brush verb (TOUCH)

B2 [I + adv/prep, T] to touch (something) quickly and lightly or carelessly: Charlotte brushed against him (= touched him quickly and lightly with her arm or body) as she left the room. His lips gently brushed her cheek and he was gone.
C1 [T + adv/prep] to move something somewhere using a brush or your hand: Jackie brushed the hair out of her eyes. He brushed away a tear. She stood up and brushed the wrinkles from her dress.

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  • brush verb (CLEAN)

A2 [T] to clean something or make something smooth with a brush: When did he last brush his teeth, she wondered. She brushed her hair with long, regular strokes. [+ obj + adj ] My trousers got covered in mud, but luckily I was able to brush them clean.

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(Definition of brush from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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