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Definition of “bundle” - English Dictionary

"bundle" in American English

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bundlenoun [C]

 us   /ˈbʌn·dəl/
  • bundle noun [C] (GROUP)

a ​number of things that are ​fastened or ​held together: He ​carried bundles of ​newspapers to the ​garage.
infml A bundle is also a ​largeamount of ​money: When they ​soldtheirhouse, they made a bundle.

bundleverb

 us   /ˈbʌn·dəl/
  • bundle verb (FASTEN)

[T] to ​fasten a ​number of things together: [I/T] We’re ​supposed to bundle ​magazines before ​throwing them away.
  • bundle verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[always + adv/prep] to ​cause someone to move ​quickly: [I] We bundled into the ​car. [T] Every ​morning I bundled the ​children off to ​school.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of bundle from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"bundle" in British English

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bundlenoun [C]

uk   /ˈbʌn.dəl/  us   /ˈbʌn.dəl/
C2 a ​number of things that have been ​fastened or are ​held together: a bundle ofclothes/​newspapers/​books a bundle ofsticks

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

bundleverb

uk   /ˈbʌn.dəl/  us   /ˈbʌn.dəl/
  • bundle verb (PUSH)

[I or T, + adv/prep] to ​push or put someone or something ​somewherequickly and ​roughly: He bundled his ​clothes into the ​washingmachine. She was bundled into the back of the ​car. The ​children were bundled off to ​school early that ​morning.
bundling
noun [U] uk   /ˈbʌnd.lɪŋ/  us   /ˈbʌnd.lɪŋ/
the ​act of ​selling several ​products or ​services together: the bundling of ​services/​software/​products
(Definition of bundle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"bundle" in Business English

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bundlenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈbʌndl/
COMMERCE, MARKETING a ​combination of ​products, ​services, or ​pieces of ​equipment that are ​supplied together or ​sold as a ​group: Phone ​companies depend on being able to ​sell a bundle of services - ​long-distance, ​localcalling, ​Internetaccess, ​wireless - to be ​profitable. software bundles
informal MONEY a large ​amount of ​money: make/earn a bundle He made a bundle on the ​stockmarket. cost/​spend/​save a bundle

bundleverb

uk   us   /ˈbʌndl/
COMMERCE, MARKETING to ​addextraproducts, ​services, or ​pieces of ​equipment to another ​product or ​service and ​sell them together, so you get the ​extraproduct, ​service, etc. for ​free or for a ​cheaperprice: bundle sth with sth Check whether there is any ​lifeinsurancecover bundled with the ​pension. bundled ​products/​services bundled ​software/games
(Definition of bundle from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “bundle”
in Korean 묶음, 꾸러미…
in Arabic حُزْمة, صُرّة…
in Malaysian ikat…
in French ballot…
in Russian пачка, узел…
in Chinese (Traditional) 束,捆…
in Italian fascio, rotolo…
in Turkish denk, bohça, demet…
in Polish zawiniątko, pakunek…
in Spanish fardo…
in Vietnamese bó…
in Portuguese fardo, feixe…
in Thai มัด…
in German das Bündel…
in Catalan feix, farcell…
in Japanese 束, 1つにまとめたもの…
in Chinese (Simplified) 束,捆…
in Indonesian bundel, berkas, ikat…
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“bundle” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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