butt Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “butt” - English Dictionary

"butt" in American English

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buttnoun

 us   /bʌt/
  • butt noun (THICK END)

[C] the ​thick end of something, esp. a ​rifle (= ​type of ​gun)
  • butt noun (CIGARETTE)

[C] the ​part of a ​cigarette that is ​left after ​smoking
  • butt noun (BOTTOM)

[C] slang a person’s ​bottom
  • butt noun (PERSON)

[C usually sing] a ​person who is ​joked about or ​laughed at: He was ​fed up with being the butt of ​theirjokes.

buttverb [I/T]

 us   /bʌt/
to ​hit the ​head hard against something, or to have the ​heads of two ​people or ​animalshit against each other: [T] fig. She often butted ​heads with ​schoolofficials in ​disagreements over her ​teachingmethods.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of butt from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"butt" in British English

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buttnoun

uk   us   /bʌt/
  • butt noun (CIGARETTE)

[C] the ​part of a ​finishedcigarette that has not been ​smoked
  • butt noun (BOTTOM)

C1 [C] mainly US slang forbottom: She told him to get off his butt and do something ​useful.

buttverb [I or T]

uk   us   /bʌt/
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of butt from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “butt”
in Spanish culata…
in Vietnamese đầu mẩu thuốc lá…
in Malaysian putung rokok…
in Thai ก้นบุหรี่…
in French mégot…
in German der Stummel…
in Chinese (Simplified) 香烟, 烟蒂,烟头…
in Turkish kıç, popo, izmarit…
in Russian задница, окурок, приклад…
in Indonesian puntung…
in Chinese (Traditional) 香煙, 煙蒂,煙頭…
in Polish tyłek, pet, kolba…
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