call Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “call” - English Dictionary

Definition of "call" - American English Dictionary

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callverb

 us   /kɔl/

call verb (NAME)

[T] to give someone or something a ​name, or to ​know or ​address someone by a ​particularname: They can’t ​decide whether to call ​their new ​baby Carol or Alice. His ​name is Anthony, but everyone calls him ​Tony.call someone names To call someone ​names is to use ​rude or ​insulting words to ​describe someone: Politicians ​waste a lot of ​time calling each other ​names and ​criticizing each other.

call verb (TELEPHONE)

[I/T] to ​telephone someone: [I] I called last ​night and ​left a ​message. [T] Jenny called me and ​invited us over for the ​weekend.call someone collect If you call someone ​collect, you ​telephone someone who ​agrees to ​pay for the ​cost of ​talking to you

call verb (SAY)

[I/T] to say something in a ​loudvoice, esp. in ​order to get someone’s ​attention: [T] “Answer ‘Here!’ when I call ​yourname,” the ​teacher said.call the roll If you call the ​roll you ​readaloud the ​names of all the ​people on a ​list to make ​certain that each ​person is ​present: The ​teacher calls the ​roll at the ​beginning of each ​day.

call verb (ASK TO COME)

[I/T] to ​ask someone to come to you: [I] I ​ran to Jonathan as ​soon as I ​heard him call. [T] You’d ​better call an ​ambulance. [M] Susan, would you call in the next ​patient, ​please?

call verb (CONSIDER)

[T] to ​consider someone or something to be something: I wouldn’t call him a ​friend – he’s just someone I ​met. The ​umpire called him ​safe on a ​closeplay.

call verb (ASK FOR)

[T] to ​ask for or ​demand something, or to ​decideofficially to have a ​particularevent: The ​mayor called a ​meeting of ​localorganizations to ​discussbudgetpriorities.

callnoun

 us   /kɔl/

call noun (BEING ASKED TO COME)

[C] a ​visit that someone makes, esp. as ​part of a ​job: The ​locksmith is out on a call ​right now.on call People who ​work in ​medicine and other ​importantactivities are said to be on call when they are ​available to make ​visits or to ​speak to someone on the ​telephone at any ​time: Dr. Menendez is on call for the next 24 ​hours.

call noun (DECISION)

[C] a ​decision: I really don’t ​know what to do – it’s ​your call.

call noun (CAUSE)

[C/U] a ​reason or ​cause: [U] There’s no call for you to get so ​angry – I was just ​kidding.

call noun (SOUNDS)

[C] a ​loudsound made by a ​person or ​animal: Where we ​camp, near the ​river, you can ​hear the call of the ​wolfalmost every ​night. [C] the ​characteristiccry of a ​bird: Students ​tried to ​imitate the calls of ​theirfavoritebirds.
(Definition of call from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "call" - British English Dictionary

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callverb

uk   /kɔːl/  us   /kɑːl/

call verb (NAME)

B1 [T + obj + noun ] to give someone or something a ​name, or to ​know or ​address someone by a ​particularname: They've called the ​twins Edward and Thomas. What's that ​actor called that we ​saw in the ​film last ​night? His ​realname is Jonathan, but they've always called him Johnny. What's her new ​novel called? I ​wish he wouldn't ​keep calling me "​dear" - it's so ​patronizing!call sb names C2 If a ​person, ​especially a ​child, calls someone ​names, he or she ​addresses that ​person with a ​name that is ​intended to be ​offensive: Tom's ​worried that if he ​wearsglasses at ​school the other ​children will call him ​names.
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call verb (PHONE)

A2 [I or T] to use a ​phone to ​talk to someone: He called (you) last ​night when you were out. She called (me) this ​morning at the ​office and we had a ​briefchat. I've been calling all ​morning but I can't get through. Do you ​think we should call the ​police?call collect US (US also and UK reverse (the) charges) to make a ​phone call that is ​paid for by the ​person who ​receives it
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call verb (CONSIDER)

[T + obj + noun ] to ​consider someone or something to be: He ​knows a lot of ​people, but only one or two that he'd call ​closefriends. One ​sandwich and a ​lettuceleaf - I don't call that a ​meal! I'm not calling you a ​liar - I'm just ​suggesting that you ​misunderstood the ​facts of the ​situation.call sth your own to ​consider something as ​belonging to you: I don't aspire to anything very ​grand - I just ​want a ​place I can call my own.
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call verb (SHOUT/CRY)

B1 [I or T] to say something in a ​loudvoice, ​especially in ​order to ​attract someone's ​attention, or (of ​animals) to make a ​loud, high ​sound, ​especially to another ​animal: Someone in the ​crowd called (out) his ​name. Did you call? [+ speech] "Hey, you! Come over here!" she called. The ​blackbird called toitsmate.call for order (also call sth to order) to ​askpeople in a ​meeting to ​stoptalking so that the ​meeting can ​continue: She called for ​order/called the ​meeting to ​order.
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call verb (ASK TO COME)

C1 [I or T] to ​ask someone to come to you: She called me over to where she was ​sitting. I ​keep the ​bedroomdooropen in ​case the ​children call (for) me in the ​night. I was called to an ​emergencymeeting this ​morning. At ​school she was always being called into the headteacher's ​office.
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call verb (VISIT)

[I] to ​visit someone, ​especially for a ​shorttime: The ​electrician must have called (round) this ​morning when we were out - there's a ​note on the ​doormat.

call verb (DECIDE ON)

C1 [T] to ​decideofficially to have a ​particularevent or take ​particularaction: The ​managingdirector has called a ​meeting to ​discusspaylevels. The ​papers are ​predicting that the ​primeminister will call an ​election in the ​spring. It's ​reckoned that the ​unions will call a ​strike if ​management will not ​agree to ​theirdemands. They had to call a ​halt to (= end) the ​match because of the ​heavyrain.

callnoun

uk   /kɔːl/  us   /kɑːl/

call noun (PHONE)

A2 [C] the ​act of using the ​phone: I got a call from an ​oldcollegefriend last ​night. If there are any calls for me, could you write them down next to the ​phone? I've just got a ​couple of calls to make. That ​decorator you called about ​painting the ​house - did he ​ever returnyour call? The ​radiostation received a lot of calls ​complaining about the show's ​badlanguage. Before six o'clock, calls are ​charged at ​peakrate.
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call noun (ANIMAL)

B1 [C] the ​sound an ​animal makes or the ​sound of someone ​shouting something: The ​whale has a very ​distinctive call. She could ​hear calls for ​help from inside the ​burningbuilding. I'll be in the next ​room, so give me a call if you need any ​help.
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call noun (DEMAND)

[U] the ​fact of ​peoplewanting or ​needing a ​particular thing: There's not much call forfurcoats these ​days.formal I ​certainly don't ​think there's any call for that ​sort of ​language, ​younglady!C1 [C] a ​demand for something to ​happen: Management have so ​farignored the union's calls forstrictersafetyregulations.

call noun (VISIT)

C1 [C] a ​shortvisit, ​especially an ​official one made by someone whose ​job is ​connected with ​health: Doctor Seward is out on a call this ​morning. The ​nurse has got a few calls to make this ​afternoon.old-fashioned I ​thought I'd pay a call on (= ​visit) an ​oldfriend of mine this ​weekend.

call noun (DECISION)

[C] informal a ​decision: It was a tough call, but ​eventually I ​decided to give up my ​job. More ​investment? That's got to be ​your call - you're the one that's ​paying!
(Definition of call from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "call" - Business English Dictionary

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callverb

uk   us   /kɔːl/
[I or T] COMMUNICATIONS to ​phone someone: I'll tell Mr Baker you called. Would you like me to ​pass on any ​message? Please call us as soon as possible so that we can ​resolve this ​issue.
call collect (also reverse (the) charges) US COMMUNICATIONS to make a ​phone call that is ​paid for by the ​person who receives it: To call ​collect from ​overseas, you need to ​reach an ​internationaloperator.
[T] to ​ask or ​demand that a particular ​action should be taken or that a particular ​event should ​happen: call an election/meeting/strike An ​emergencymeeting of the ​board was called for the next day.
call for order (also call sb/sth to order) MEETINGS, LAW to ​askpeople in a ​meeting or ​lawcourt to be ​quiet so that the ​meeting or ​legalaction can continue: The senator called the Judiciary Committee ​meeting to ​order. A ​deputy called for ​order in the ​courtroom.
[T] (also call sth in) FINANCE to say ​officially that ​borrowedmoney must be ​paid back: call (in) a debt/loan The ​contract gives the ​lender the ​right to call a ​loan if the ​borrowersells the ​property.
call (in) a bond FINANCE to ​pay back ​money to a ​person or ​organizationholding a bond before the ​date when the ​bond matures (= when it would ​normally be ​paid back): When ​interestratesplunge, a ​company may decide to call a ​bond.
[T] to ​ask someone to come to a ​place: call sb in/into/over He was called into a manager's ​office and told that, after 26 ​years of ​service, he was no ​longer needed. She called me over and ​asked if I was interested in ​applying for the ​job.
[I] to visit a ​person or ​place for a ​shorttime: A ​salesman called at my ​home.
[T] informal to say that a particular ​event or ​action will ​happen in the future: He ​claims to have called the ​downturn in the ​economy nearly four ​years ago.
[T] LAW to make someone say what they know about a ​situation, in a ​court of ​law or to a ​governmentofficial or ​group: The ​committee can call ​witnesses and compel them to answer ​questions.

callnoun

uk   us   /kɔːl/
[C] COMMUNICATIONS an ​act of communicating with someone by ​phone: a phone/telephone call I'm expecting a ​phone call from him this morning.a local/international/long-distance call The ​company is ​droppinginternational call ​charges to over 20 countries.make/place a call We're not ​allowed to make ​private calls at ​work.get/receive/take a call Thank you for taking my call.return sb's call He was ​busy when I ​contacted him and he didn't ​return my calls.
[C] a ​short visit, especially one for a particular or ​officialpurpose: a ​customer/​sales callpay a call on sb While I was in the ​area, I took the ​opportunity of ​paying a call on one of my ​clients.
See also
[C] a ​demand for something to ​happen: a call for sth Yesterday there were ​renewed calls for a ​change in the ​law.
[C or U] a ​situation in which ​people or ​businesses want or need a particular thing: a call for/on sth Energy ​efficiency and ​conservation could ​lead to a ​reduced call for ​exports.no call for sth There is no call for such luxuries in the ​presenteconomicclimate. He was ​finding that there were a ​numbers of calls on his ​time in his new role.
[C] STOCK MARKET a ​demand made by a ​company to ​shareholders for ​payment of ​money they ​owe for ​shares for which they have ​paid only ​part of the ​price: Shareholders received ​notice of a call of 40 ​centspershare on all partly paid-up ​shares.
FINANCE a ​demand for ​money that is ​owed to be ​paid back: Your ​loan may contain a call ​provision if you ​fall behind on your ​payments.
[C] FINANCE call option
at/on call FINANCE, STOCK MARKET used to describe a ​loan that must be ​paid back immediately upon the ​request of the ​financialorganizationlending the ​money: Many ​banks have ​moneymarketloans at call with ​discounthouses. BANKING used to describe a ​bankaccount from which you can take ​money out when you ​ask for it: All our ​accounts are at-call ​accounts that ​require no ​minimumdeposit or ​balance.
on call HR available to ​work when needed: He is on call round-the-clock two weeks each month.
(Definition of call from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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