Definition of “cancel” - English Dictionary

“cancel” in British English

See all translations

cancelverb

uk /ˈkæn.səl/ us /ˈkæn.səl/ -ll- or US usually -l-

B1 [ I or T ] to decide that an organized event will not happen, or to stop an order for goods or services that you no longer want:

They had to cancel tomorrow's game because of the bad weather.
The 7.10 train to Budapest has been cancelled.
to cancel a magazine subscription

[ T ] to mark a stamp to show that it has been used and cannot be used again

More examples

  • She had to cancel her dental appointment.
  • I can't cancel my arrangements at such short notice.
  • My flight was cancelled.
  • The original orders were cancelled and I was given fresh instructions.
  • The concert has been cancelled owing to lack of support.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “cancel” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“cancel” in American English

See all translations

cancelverb [ I/T ]

us /ˈkæn·səl/ -l-, -ll-

to decide that something arranged in advance will not happen, or to state that you do not wish to receive something:

[ I ] We were supposed to meet for dinner but Elise had to cancel at the last minute.

If a stamp or check is canceled, it is marked to show it has been used:

[ T ] He collects canceled stamps.
cancellation
noun [ C/U ] us /ˌkæn·səˈleɪ·ʃən/

[ C ] All the tickets were sold, so we waited to see if there were any cancellations.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “cancel” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“cancel” in Business English

See all translations

cancelverb [ I or T ]

uk /ˈkænsəl/ us -ll-, US usually -l-

to decide that something that has been arranged will not happen:

cancel a flight/meeting/trip When a flight is cancelled, an airline is obliged to provide alternative transport or a refund.
"I canceled at the last minute,'' he said.

LAW to officially end a legal agreement or responsibility:

cancel a contract/debt/obligation Leaders pledged to cancel the debt of the world’s most indebted countries.

LAW, BANKING to mark a cheque or other document to show that it has been used and cannot be used again:

Consumers who need a canceled check to prove that they made a payment can ask for a copy.

COMMERCE to stop an order for goods or services that you no longer want or need:

Protesters are urging the government to cancel the order for the new weapons system.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “cancel” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)