capture Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “capture” - English Dictionary

Definition of "capture" - American English Dictionary

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captureverb [T]

 us   /ˈkæp·tʃər/

capture verb [T] (POSSESS)

to take someone as a ​prisoner, or to take something into ​yourpossession: These ​birds were captured in the ​wild in 1987.

capture verb [T] (RECORD)

to ​recordsound or ​images, or to ​express a ​feeling: She captured the ​incident on ​video. Those ​songs capture the ​romanticmood of the ​movie.
capture
noun [U]  us   /ˈkæp·tʃər, -ʃər/
They were ​shown on TV ​soon after ​their capture.
(Definition of capture from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "capture" - British English Dictionary

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captureverb [T]

uk   /ˈkæp.tʃər/  us   /-tʃɚ/

capture verb [T] (CATCH)

B2 to take someone as a ​prisoner, or to take something into ​yourpossession, ​especially by ​force: Two of the ​soldiers were ​killed and the ​rest were captured. Rebel ​forces captured the ​city after a week-long ​battle. to ​succeed in getting something when you are ​competing with other ​people: The Democratic Party captured 70 ​percent of the ​vote.
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capture verb [T] (RECORD)

B2 to ​represent or ​describe something very ​accurately using words or ​images: It would be ​impossible to capture her ​beauty in a ​painting.B2 to ​record or take a ​picture of something using a ​camera: A ​passer-by captured the ​wholeincident on ​film. specialized computing If a ​computer or ​similarmachine captures ​information, it ​takes it in and ​stores it.

capture verb [T] (INTEREST)

C1 If something captures ​yourimagination or ​attention, you ​feel very ​interested and ​excited by it: The American ​drive to ​land a man on the Moon captured the imagination/​attention of the ​wholeworld.
capture
noun [S or U] uk   us  
C1 They ​witnessed the capture of the ​city by ​rebeltroops.
(Definition of capture from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "capture" - Business English Dictionary

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captureverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkæptʃər/
to ​succeed in getting something when you are ​competing with others: capture a large share/10%/30% of the market It was ​predicted that the ​internet could capture 5% of the US ​retailmarket within three ​years. They have captured a ​majorposition in a ​worldwidemarket. A ​corporation can ​profit by capturing ​resources more ​cheaply.
IT if a ​computer, camera, or other ​machine captures ​information, it ​changes it into a ​form that it can ​process and ​store: New ​digitalvideotechnology makes it possible to capture and ​store an almost limitless ​volume of ​footage at ​minimalcost. capture ​data/​images/​information
ENVIRONMENT, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY to ​catch and ​collect the carbon dioxideproduced by ​machines and ​processes so that it is not ​released into the ​environment: Coal-fired ​powerstations must be retrofitted to capture ​carbon dioxide.

capturenoun [U]

uk   us   /ˈkæptʃər/
IT the ​process of ​changinginformation into a ​form that a ​computer or other ​machine can ​process and ​store: document/image/information capture They ​developsoftwaretools for ​document capture and ​imageenhancement.
ENVIRONMENT, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY the ​act of catching and ​collecting carbon dioxide so that it is not ​released into the ​environment: Facilities are ​required to ​plan for the capture of ​carbon dioxide in ​compliance with ​federalstandards.
the ​act of ​winning or getting ​control of something: The ​channel may ​increasesubscriptionfees to ​pay for its €240 million capture of Champions League ​screeningrights.
(Definition of capture from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“capture” in Business English

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