carbon dioxide Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “carbon dioxide” - English Dictionary

"carbon dioxide" in American English

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carbon dioxidenoun [U]

 /ˈkɑr·bən dɑɪˈɑk·sɑɪd/
biology the ​gasproduced when ​animal or ​vegetablematter is ​burned, or when ​animalsbreathe out
(Definition of carbon dioxide from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"carbon dioxide" in British English

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carbon dioxidenoun [U]

uk   us   (symbol CO2)
B2 the ​gasformed when ​carbon is ​burned, or when ​people or ​animalsbreathe out: carbondioxide emissions

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(Definition of carbon dioxide from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"carbon dioxide" in Business English

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carbon dioxidenoun [U]

uk   us   (also carbon, abbreviation CO2)
ENVIRONMENT the ​gasformed when carbon is ​burned, or when ​people or animals breathe out. Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse ​gas: The UK ​plans to ​reduce carbon dioxide ​emissions by 60% by 2050. Hotter days could be ​ahead as the carbon dioxide ​levels in Earth's atmosphere continue to ​rise.emit/release carbon dioxide Human ​energyconsumptionreleases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. absorb/​capture carbon dioxide
(Definition of carbon dioxide from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “carbon dioxide”
in Arabic ثاني أكسيد الكَربون…
in Korean 이산화탄소…
in Portuguese dióxido de carbono…
in Catalan diòxid de carboni…
in Japanese 二酸化炭素…
in Chinese (Simplified) 二氧化碳…
in Turkish karbondioksit…
in Russian углекислый газ…
in Chinese (Traditional) 二氧化碳…
in Italian diossido di carbonio…
in Polish dwutlenek węgla…
What is the pronunciation of carbon dioxide?
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