care Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “care” - English Dictionary

"care" in American English

See all translations

carenoun

 us   /keər/
  • care noun (HELP)

[U] the ​process of ​providing for the ​needs of someone or something: The ​quality of care at this ​hospital is very good. Trees on ​cityproperty don’t get any care.
  • care noun (ATTENTION)

[U] seriousattention, esp. to the ​details of a ​situation or a ​piece of ​work: She painted the ​windowframes with ​great care.

careverb

 us   /ker, kær/
  • care verb (WORRY)

to be ​interested in something, or to be ​anxious or ​upset about something: [I] Don’t you care about what ​happens to the ​children? [I] I really don’t care if we go or not (= It doesn’t ​matter to me). [+ question word] I don’t care how much it ​costs, just ​buy it.
  • care verb (WANT)

[I] fml (used in ​politeoffers and ​suggestions) to ​want something: [+ to infinitive] Would you care to ​join us for ​dinner?
(Definition of care from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"care" in British English

See all translations

carenoun

uk   /keər/  us   /ker/
  • care noun (PROTECTION)

B2 [U] the ​process of ​protecting someone or something and ​providing what that ​person or thing ​needs: The ​standard of care at ​ourlocalhospital is ​excellent. Mira's going to be very ​weak for a ​longtime after the ​operation, so she'll need a lot of care. Nurseries are ​responsible for the ​children intheir care.
[U] used as a ​combiningform: skincare/​healthcare/​childcare
take care of sb/sth
B1 to ​protect someone or something and ​provide the things that that ​person or thing ​needs: Take good care of that ​girl of yours, Patrick - she's very ​special. Don't ​worry about me, I can take care of myself (= I do not need anyone ​else to ​protect me).
in care (also take/put into care) UK
Children who are in care or who have been taken/put into care are not ​living with ​theirnaturalparents but ​instead with a ​national or ​localgovernmentorganization or another ​family: Both ​children were taken into care when ​theirparentsdied.
care in the community UK
a ​system in which ​people with ​mentalillness or ​reducedmentalability are ​allowed to ​continueliving in ​their own ​homes, with ​treatment and ​help, and are not ​kept in ​hospital

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • care noun (ATTENTION)

B1 [U] seriousattention, ​especially to the ​details of a ​situation or thing: She ​painted the ​windowframes withgreat care so that no ​paint got onto the ​glass. You need to take a ​bit more care withyourspelling. The ​roads are ​icy, so ​drive with care. Take care on these ​busyroads (= ​drive with ​attention so that you do not have an ​accident). [+ to infinitive] Take care not to (= make ​certain that you do not)spillyourcoffee. [+ that] Take care (= make ​certain) that you don't ​fall. The ​parcel had a ​label on it saying "Handle with care".

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

careverb [I]

uk   /keər/  us   /ker/
  • care verb [I] (WORRY)

B1 to ​think that something is ​important and to ​feelinterested in it or ​upset about it: She's never cared very much about her ​appearance. [+ question word] I really don't care whether we go out or not. I don't care how much it ​costs, just ​buy it. "Was Lorna ​happy about the ​arrangements?" "I don't ​know and I don't care." Your ​parents are only doing this because they care about (= ​love) you.
I couldn't care less C1 UK informal (US I could care less)
used to ​emphasizerudely that you are not ​interested in or ​worried about something or someone: "Mike's really ​fed up about it." "I couldn't care less."
for all I care informal
used to say that you are not ​interested in or ​worried about what someone ​else is doing: You can go to the ​match with Paula, for all I care.
as if I care informal
used to say that you are not ​interested in or ​worried about something that has ​happened or that someone has said: He said he didn't ​approve of what I'd done, as if I cared.
who cares? B2 informal
used to ​emphasizerudely that you do not ​think something is ​important: "It ​looks as if we are going to ​lose." "Who cares?".

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • "I don't care - you ​choose, " he said, with an ​airywave of the ​hand.
  • "I don't care what you ​think", she ​flung (back) at him.
  • You could be the Queen of ​England, for all I care - you're not coming in here without a ​ticket.
  • I don't care about ​fashion, I ​dress how I ​please.
  • I don't care if he ​likes it or not - I'm coming!
(Definition of care from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"care" in Business English

See all translations

carenoun [U]

uk   us   /keər/
attention that is given to something or someone, so that they are looked after, ​protected, or dealt with in the ​right way: There will be some mistakes no matter how much care goes into the first ​draft.take care over sth People are taking more care over where they ​invest their ​money.take care to do sth Take care to prepare for your ​interview by ​listing all the ​personalqualities and ​experience you have which ​suit you for the ​job.
care of
( abbreviation c/o) COMMUNICATIONS used in ​addresses when the ​person you are writing to is ​staying or ​working somewhere that is not the ​place where they usually ​live or ​work: You can ​sendpackages to me care of my ​hotel. Address your ​letters to Write On, c/o BBC, Broadcasting ​House, London.
take care of sth/sb
to ​look after or ​protect something or someone: Take care of your ​home: it's your largest ​asset. People are doing this ​job to put ​food on the ​table and take care of their children.
to ​deal with or be ​responsible for something: He suggested she could ​helprun the ​firm and take care of the ​finances. I'll take care of all the ​travelarrangements.
(Definition of care from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of care?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“care” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More