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Definition of “carry” - English Dictionary

"carry" in American English

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carryverb

 us   /ˈkær·i/
  • carry verb (TRANSPORT)

[T] to ​transport or take from one ​place to another: The ​plane carried 116 ​passengers and a ​crew of seven. Would you like me to carry ​yourbag for you? Underground ​cables carry ​electricity to all ​parts of the ​city.
  • carry verb (HAVE WITH YOU)

[T] to have something with you from one ​place to another: I carry my ​wallet in my back ​pocket. I don’t carry a lot of ​cash.
  • carry verb (SPREAD)

[T] to take something from one ​person or thing and give it to another ​person or thing; to ​spread: The ​mosquitoes will be ​studied to ​see if they carry the ​virus.
  • carry verb (HAVE)

[T] to have something as a ​part, ​quality, or ​result: All ​ourrentalcars carry ​collisioninsurance. I’m ​sorry, we don’t carry ​shoes (= we do not ​sellshoes). His ​argument carries a lot of ​conviction (= is ​supported by ​strongbelief).
  • carry verb (SUPPORT WEIGHT)

[T] to ​support the ​weight of something: The ​weight of the ​roof is carried by ​steelbeams.
  • carry verb (KEEP IN OPERATION)

[T] to ​support, ​keep in ​operation, or make a ​success: We cannot ​afford to carry ​people who don’t do ​theirshare of the ​work.
  • carry verb (WIN)

[T] to ​win the ​support, ​agreement, or ​sympathy of a ​group of ​people: Gore is ​expected to carry (= get the most ​votes in) the midwestern ​states.
  • carry verb (APPROVE)

[T] to ​winapproval or ​support for something: With 21 ​votes for, and 8 ​opposed, the ​motion is carried.
  • carry verb (COMMUNICATE)

[T] to ​include a ​particularitem of ​news, ​information, etc. in something ​printed, ​broadcast, or ​sent over ​electricwires: Newspapers and ​radio and TV ​stationsthroughout Missouri carried the ​story.
  • carry verb (REACH)

[I] (esp. of ​sounds) to be ​able to ​reach or ​travel a ​particulardistance: The ​actors’ ​voices carried all the way to the back of the ​theater.
  • carry verb (MOVE NUMBER)

[T] to put a ​number into another ​column when doing ​addition
  • carry verb (MOVE BODY)

[T] to move and ​holdyourbody in a ​particular way: You can ​tell she’s a ​dancer by the way she carries herself.
(Definition of carry from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"carry" in British English

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carryverb

uk   /ˈkær.i/  us   /ˈker.i/
  • carry verb (TRANSPORT)

A1 [I or T] to ​hold something or someone with ​yourhands, ​arms, or on ​your back and ​transport it, him, or her from one ​place to another: Would you like me to carry ​yourbag for you? She carried her ​tiredchildupstairs tobed. These ​books are too ​heavy for me to carry. We only had a ​smallsuitcase, so we were ​able to carry it onto the ​plane. Robson ​injured his ​leg in the second ​half of the ​match and had to be carried off. Thieves ​broke the ​shopwindow and carried off (= ​removed)jewelleryworth thousands of ​pounds.
B2 [I or T] to ​move someone or something from one ​place to another: The ​bus that was ​involved in the ​accident was carrying ​children toschool. The Brooklyn Bridge carries ​trafficacross the ​East River from Brooklyn to Manhattan. Police ​think that the ​body was carried down the ​river (= was ​transported by the ​flow of the ​river). Underground ​cables carry ​electricity to all ​parts of the ​city. Rubbish ​left on the ​beach during the ​day is carried away (= ​removed) at ​night by the ​tide.

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  • carry verb (HAVE WITH YOU)

B1 [T] to have something with you all the ​time: Police ​officers in ​Britain do not usually carry ​guns.figurative He will carry the memory of the ​accident with him (= will ​remember the ​accident) for ​ever.

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  • carry verb (HAVE)

C2 [T] to have something as a ​part, ​quality, or ​result: All ​cigarettepackets carry a ​governmenthealthwarning. Our ​cars carry a twelve-month ​guarantee. His ​speech carried so much conviction that I had to ​agree with him. In some ​countries, ​murder carries the ​deathpenalty. I'm ​afraid my ​opinion doesn't carry any weight with (= ​influence) my ​boss.US The ​salesclerk said they didn't carry (= have a ​supply of)sportswear.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • carry verb (SPREAD)

C1 [T] to take something from one ​person or thing and give it to another ​person or thing: Malaria is a ​disease carried by ​mosquitoes.
  • carry verb (KEEP IN OPERATION)

[T] to ​support, ​keep in ​operation, or make a ​success: We can no ​longerafford to carry ​people who don't ​work as hard as they should. Luckily they had a very ​strongactor in the ​mainpart and he ​managed to carry the ​wholeplay (= make a ​success of it through his own ​performance).
  • carry verb (WIN)

[T] to ​win the ​support, ​agreement, or ​sympathy of a ​group of ​people: The ​bosses' ​plans to ​reorganize the ​company won't ​succeedunless they can carry the ​workforce with them.
  • carry verb (DEVELOP)

[T usually + adv/prep] to ​develop or ​continue something: Lenin carried Marx's ​ideas a ​stagefurther by putting them into ​practice. If we carry this ​argument toitslogicalconclusion, we ​realize that ​furtherinvestment is not a good ​idea. She carries ​tidiness toextremes/toitslimits (= she is too ​tidy). We must end here, but we can carry today's ​discussion forward at ​our next ​meeting. He always carries his ​jokes too ​far (= he ​continues making ​jokes when he should have ​stopped).
  • carry verb (MOVE BODY)

carry yourself
to ​moveyourbody in a ​particular way: You can ​tell she's a ​dancer from the way that she carries herself.
  • carry verb (MATHEMATICS)

[T] to put a ​number into another ​column when doing ​addition
(Definition of carry from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"carry" in Business English

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carryverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkæri/
TRANSPORT to ​transport or take something from one ​place to another: The ​railroad carries ​tons of ​freight every day.
COMMERCE to ​offer something for ​sale: Does this ​store carry camping ​equipment?

carrynoun

uk   us   /ˈkæri/
the Carry
informal FINANCE →  carried interest
(Definition of carry from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“carry” in Business English

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