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Definition of “chance” - English Dictionary

"chance" in American English

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chancenoun

us   /tʃæns/
  • chance noun (OPPORTUNITY)

[C] an occasion that allows something to be done; an opportunity: If you get a chance, come over and see me. You had many chances to back out of the deal, and you didn’t do it. She’d been a substitute on the team, and she wanted a chance to play every day.
  • chance noun (LIKELIHOOD)

[U] a level of possibility that something will happen; likelihood: I’ve applied to seven different universities, and there’s a good chance I’ll get into two of them.
  • chance noun (RISK)

[C] a possibility that something bad will happen; a risk: There’s a chance of injury in almost any sport. You don’t get anywhere in life without taking chances.
  • chance noun (LUCK)

[U] the happening of something in a way that no one could have known, so that it seems to have no cause: Four years ago we met by chance in Paris. Do you by any chance know when the last bus leaves tonight?

chanceverb

us   /tʃæns/
  • chance verb (RISK)

[T] to do something although it involves risk: It’s a very popular restaurant, and we may not get a table, but let’s chance it.
  • chance verb (LUCK)

[I] to happen or find something in a way that is not planned or expected: I chanced upon some old love letters in a drawer.
(Definition of chance from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"chance" in British English

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chancenoun

uk   /tʃɑːns/ us   /tʃæns/
  • chance noun (OPPORTUNITY)

B1 [C] an occasion that allows something to be done: I didn't get/have a chance to speak to her. [+ to infinitive] If you give me a chance to speak, I'll explain. Society has to give prisoners a second chance when they come out of jail. He left and I missed my chance to say goodbye to him. I'd go now given half a chance (= if I had the slightest opportunity).
Synonym

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  • chance noun (POSSIBILITY)

B1 [S or plural] the level of possibility that something will happen: You'd have a better chance/more chance of passing your exams if you worked a bit harder. [+ (that)] There's a good chance (that) I'll have this essay finished by tomorrow. There's a slim/slight chance (that) I might have to go to Manchester next week. If we hurry, there's still an outside (= very small) chance of catching the plane. "Is there any chance of speaking to him?" "Not a/No chance, I'm afraid." I don't think I stand/have a chance of winning.UK John thinks they're in with a chance (= they have a possibility of doing or getting what they want). Her resignation has improved my chances of promotion. What are her chances of survival? [+ that] What are the chances that they'll win?
Synonym

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  • chance noun (RISK)

B2 [C] a possibility that something negative will happen: I'm delivering my work by hand - I'm not taking any chances. There's a chance of injury in almost any sport.
Synonym

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  • chance noun (LUCK)

B1 [U] the force that causes things to happen without any known cause or reason for doing so: Roulette is a game of chance. I got this job completely by chance. [+ (that)] It was pure/sheer chance (that) we met. We must double-check everything and leave nothing to chance.
by any chance
C2 used to ask a question or request in a polite way: Are you Hungarian, by any chance? Could you lend me a couple of pounds, by any chance? You wouldn't, by any chance, have a calculator on you, would you?

chanceverb

uk   /tʃɑːns/ us   /tʃæns/
(Definition of chance from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of chance?
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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