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Definition of “charter” - English Dictionary

"charter" in American English

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charternoun [C]

 us   /ˈtʃɑr·t̬ər/
  • charter noun [C] (DOCUMENT)

a formal statement, esp. by a government or ruler, of the rights of a group organized for some purpose: The United Nations charter sets forth goals we all admire.
  • charter noun [C] (RENT)

an act of renting a vehicle for a special use, esp. by a group of people: Charters with low fares have attracted new airline passengers.

charterverb [T]

 us   /ˈtʃɑrt̬·ər/
  • charter verb [T] (RENT)

to rent a vehicle for a special use: He wanted to charter an airplane.
(Definition of charter from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"charter" in British English

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charternoun

uk   /ˈtʃɑː.tər/  us   /ˈtʃɑːr.t̬ɚ/
  • charter noun (OFFICIAL PAPER)

[C] a formal statement of the rights of a country's people, or of an organization or a particular social group, that is agreed by or demanded from a ruler or government: a charter of rights Education is one of the basic human rights written into the United Nations Charter. The government has produced a Citizen's/Parents'/Patients' Charter.
  • charter noun (RENT)

[U] the renting of a vehicle: boats for charter a charter flight a major charter operator

charterverb [T]

uk   /ˈtʃɑː.tər/  us   /ˈtʃɑːr.t̬ɚ/
  • charter verb [T] (RENT)

to rent a vehicle, especially an aircraft, for a special use and not as part of a regular service: They've chartered a plane to take delegates to the conference.
  • charter verb [T] (OFFICIAL START)

to officially start a new organization by giving it a charter: Cambridge University Press was chartered in 1534.
(Definition of charter from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"charter" in Business English

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charternoun

uk   us   /ˈtʃɑːtər/
[C] GOVERNMENT, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY a formal statement of the rights of a country's people, or a particular social group, which is agreed by or demanded from a government, etc.: Education is one of the basic human rights written into the United Nations Charter.
[C] a statement of the aims and values of an organization, etc.: The city charter and state law require the city to enact a balanced budget before April 1.
[C] LAW in the US, an official document that shows that a company has been formed legally and that controls how it operates: Commercial banks with a national charter are supervised by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.
[U] TRANSPORT the renting of a plane or ship: a charter flight a major charter operator

charterverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈtʃɑːtər/
TRANSPORT to rent a plane or ship, for a special use and not as part of a regular service: The company chartered a plane to take executives to the conference.
LAW to start a new organization by giving it an official charter: The Second Bank of the United States was chartered in 1816.
(Definition of charter from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“charter” in Business English

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