Definition of “choose” - English Dictionary

american-english dictionary

“choose” in British English

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chooseverb [ I or T ]

uk /tʃuːz/ us /tʃuːz/ chose, chosen

A1 to decide what you want from two or more things or possibilities:

She had to choose between the two men in her life.
Danny, come here and choose your ice cream.
He chose a shirt from the many in his wardrobe.
[ + question word ] It's difficult choosing where to live.
I've chosen a present for Luis.
[ + two objects ] UK I've chosen Luis a present.
Yesterday the selectors chose Dales as the team's new captain.
[ + obj + to infinitive ] The firm's directors chose Emma to be the new production manager.
choose to do sth

B1 to decide to do something:

Katie chose (= decided) to stay away from work that day.
little/not much to choose between

When there is little to choose between two or more things, they are (all) very similar.

More examples

  • Why did you choose to live in London?
  • You'll have to choose between a holiday or a new washing machine.
  • We chose a delicate floral pattern for our bedroom curtains.
  • Martha chose her favourite book of bedtime stories.
  • I need you to help me choose an outfit.

(Definition of “choose” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“choose” in American English

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chooseverb [ I/T ]

us /tʃuz/ past tense chose /tʃoʊz/ , past participle chosen /ˈtʃoʊ·zən/

to think about which one of several things is the one you want, and take the action to get it:

[ T ] Parents can choose the schools that they want their kids to go to.
[ I ] I can’t choose - I like both lamps.
[ I ] There was not much to choose between them (= They are similar).
[ + question word ] You can choose what you like and we’ll send it to you.

(Definition of “choose” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)