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Definition of “classic” - English Dictionary

"classic" in American English

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classicadjective

us   /ˈklæs·ɪk/
  • classic adjective (STANDARD)

being of a high standard against which others of the same type are judged: classic literature John Steinbeck's classic American novel, “The Grapes of Wrath”
  • classic adjective (TRADITIONAL)

traditional in design or style: She wore a classic blue suit and a straw hat.
  • classic adjective (TYPICAL)

having all the characteristics or qualities that are typical of something: The building is a classic example of poor design.

classicnoun [C]

us   /ˈklæs·ɪk/
  • classic noun [C] (STANDARD)

a well-known piece of writing, musical recording, or film which is of high quality and lasting value: Chaplin’s films are regarded as American classics.
(Definition of classic from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"classic" in British English

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classicadjective

uk   /ˈklæs.ɪk/ us   /ˈklæs.ɪk/
  • classic adjective (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 having a high quality or standard against which other things are judged: Fielding's classic novel "Tom Jones" Another classic goal there from Corley!

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  • classic adjective (EXTREMELY FUNNY/BAD)

informal extremely or unusually funny, bad, or annoying: Then she fell over backwards into the flowerbed - it was absolutely classic! That was classic! That van-driver signalled right, and then turned left.
  • classic adjective (TYPICAL)

having all the characteristics or qualities that you expect: He's a classic example of a kid who's clever but lazy. He had all the classic symptoms of the disease.
informal disapproving bad or unpleasant, but not very surprising or unexpected: It's classic - you arrive at the station on time and find that the train's left early.

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  • classic adjective (TRADITIONAL)

having a simple, traditional style that is always fashionable: She wore a classic navy suit.

classicnoun

uk   /ˈklæs.ɪk/ us   /ˈklæs.ɪk/
  • classic noun (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 [C] a piece of writing, a musical recording, or a film that is well known and of a high standard and lasting value: Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" is a classic of English literature. Many of the Rolling Stones' records have become rock classics.
the classics [plural]
the most famous works of literature: I spent my childhood reading the classics.

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  • classic noun (STUDY)

classics [U]
the study of ancient Greek and Roman culture, especially their languages and literature: She studied/read classics at Cambridge. a classics scholar.
(Definition of classic from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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