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Definition of “college” - English Dictionary

"college" in American English

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collegenoun [C]

us   /ˈkɑl·ɪdʒ/
a place of higher education usually for people who have finished twelve years of schooling and where they can obtain more advanced knowledge and get a degree to recognize this
A college is also one of the separate parts into which some universities are divided: She graduated from the university’s College of Business Management.
(Definition of college from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"college" in British English

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collegenoun

uk   /ˈkɒl.ɪdʒ/ us   /ˈkɑː.lɪdʒ/
  • college noun (EDUCATION)

[C or U] US a university where you can study for an undergraduate (= first) degree: I met my husband when we were in college. They want their kids to go to (= study at) college. a college student/professor/graduate
A2 [C or U] any place for specialized education after the age of 16 where people study or train to get knowledge and/or skills: a teacher training college a secretarial college a Naval college She's at art college.UK a sixth form college
[C] one of the separate and named parts into which some universities are divided: King's College, Cambridge I attended the College of Arts and Sciences at New York University. Cambridge has some very fine old colleges (= college buildings).
[C] in Britain and Australia, used in the names of some schools for children, especially private schools (= where education is paid for by parents): Cheltenham Ladies' College

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  • college noun (GROUP)

[C] a group of people with a particular job, purpose, duty, or power who are organized into a group for sharing ideas, making decisions, etc.: the Royal College of Medicine/Nursing
(Definition of college from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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