Definition of “come down” - English Dictionary

american-english dictionary
Contents

“come down” in British English

See all translations

come down

phrasal verb with come uk /kʌm/ us /kʌm/ verb came, come

(LAND)

B2 to fall and land on the ground:

A lot of trees came down in the storm.
Our plane came down in a field.
The snow came down during the night.

More examples

(LOWER LEVEL)

B2 If a price or a level comes down, it becomes lower:

House prices have come down recently.
Inflation is coming down.

informal to feel less excited after a very enjoyable experience:

The whole weekend was so wonderful I haven't come down yet.

More examples

(SUPPORT)

[ + adv/prep ] to decide that you support a particular person or side in an argument, etc.:

The government has come down on the side of military action.

(TRAVEL SOUTH)

to go to a place that is south of where you live:

My boyfriend's coming down from Scotland this weekend.
They don't come down to London much because it's too tiring with the kids.

(Definition of “come down” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“come down” in American English

See all translations

come down

phrasal verb with come us /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come

to become lower in position or value:

I am not going to buy any more coffee until the price comes down.

(Definition of “come down” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“come down” in Business English

See all translations

come down

phrasal verb with come uk /kʌm/ us verb

[ I ] if a price or a level comes down, it becomes lower:

We are expecting interest rates to come down.
come down by a third/50%/a lot, etc. Sales went up and costs came down by about a third.
come down from sth The share price came down from its high pretty quickly.

(Definition of “come down” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)