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Definition of “come on” - English Dictionary

"come on" in American English

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come on

not standard c’mon
phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (HURRY)

used for telling someone to move or act quickly or more quickly: Come on – we’re going to be late if you don’t hurry!

come on

not standard c'mon
phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (LACK BELIEF)

used for telling someone you do not believe what the person is saying or you think the person is not being serious: Oh, come on. You have no evidence whatsoever.

come on

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (START TO DEVELOP)

to start to develop gradually, as an illness or a mood: He felt one of his headaches coming on.

come-onnoun [C]

/ˈkʌmˌɔn, ˌɑn/ infml
something that is intended to attract a customer to a product: Offering cash back on a purchase is one of the oldest come-ons in the world.
(Definition of come on from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"come on" in British English

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come on

phrasal verb with come uk   /kʌm/ us   /kʌm/ verb came, come
  • (START)

C1 to start to happen or work: The heating comes on at six in the morning.
If you have an illness coming on, it is starting gradually: I think I've got a cold coming on.
UK informal If a woman comes on, her period (= the blood coming from the womb that happens every month) starts.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • (SEXUAL INTEREST)

informal to make your sexual interest known to someone: Then his wife left the room and he started coming on to me. She was coming on strong and, naturally, I responded.
  • (APPEAR)

(of an actor) to walk onto the stage: There was great applause when the Russian ballerina came on.

come-onnoun [C]

uk   /ˈkʌm.ɒn/ us   /ˈkʌm.ɑːn/ informal
(Definition of come on from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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