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Definition of “come out” - English Dictionary

"come out" in American English

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come out

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (BECOME KNOWN)

to become known or be made public: When the facts came out, there was public outrage.
A person who comes out tells something personal that has been kept secret.
When a book, magazine, or newspaper comes out, it begins to be sold to the public: Her latest book is coming out in July.

come out

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (APPEAR)

to move into full view: Later in the afternoon, it stopped raining and the sun came out.

come out

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (GIVE OPINION)

to express an opinion in public: The candidate came out in favor of lower taxes.

come out

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (FINISH)

to be in a particular condition when finished: Your painting came out really well.

come out

phrasal verb with come us   /kʌm/ verb past tense came /keɪm/ , past participle come
  • (MAKE A PICTURE)

to produce a picture on film: My camera broke and none of the skiing photographs came out.
(Definition of come out from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"come out" in British English

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come out

phrasal verb with come uk   /kʌm/ us   /kʌm/ verb came, come
  • (SOCIAL EVENT)

UK to go somewhere with someone for a social event: Would you like to come out for a drink sometime?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • Can Adam come out to play?
  • Jenny came out with us last night.
  • We can never persuade Alan to come out.
  • Would you like to come out with us some time?
  • (APPEAR)

B1 When the sun, moon, or stars come out, they appear in the sky: The clouds finally parted and the sun came out.
  • (BECOME KNOWN)

C2 If something comes out, it becomes known publicly after it has been kept secret: After her death, it came out that she'd lied about her age. When the truth came out, there was public outrage.
B2 If information, results, etc. come out, they are given to people: The exam results come out in August.
C2 to tell people that you are gay, often after having kept this secret for some time
  • (BE SAID)

C2 If something you say comes out in a particular way, that is how you say it: I didn't mean to be rude - it just came out like that. When I tried to tell her that I loved her it came out all wrong.
(Definition of come out from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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“come out” in English

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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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