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Definition of “commercial” - English Dictionary

"commercial" in American English

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commercialnoun [C]

us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃəl/
a paid advertisement on radio or television: We all ran to get something to eat during the commercials.

commercialadjective

us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃəl/
intended to make money, or relating to a business intended to make money: The movie was a commercial success (= it made money), but the critics hated it.
commercially
adverb us   /kəˈmɜr·ʃə·li/
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"commercial" in British English

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commercialadjective

uk   /kəˈmɜː.ʃəl/ us   /kəˈmɝː.ʃəl/
B2 related to buying and selling things: a commercial organization/venture/success commercial law The commercial future of the company looks very promising.
disapproving used to describe a record, film, book, etc. that has been produced with the aim of making money and as a result has little artistic value
[before noun] A commercial product can be bought by or is intended to be bought by the general public.
C2 [before noun] used to refer to radio or television paid for by advertisements that are broadcast between and during programmes

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commercially
adverb uk   /kəˈmɜː.ʃəl.i/ us   /kəˈmɝː.ʃəl.i/
Does the market research show that the product will succeed commercially (= make a profit)? The drug won't be commercially available (= able to be bought) until it has been thoroughly tested.

commercialnoun [C]

uk   /kəˈmɜː.ʃəl/ us   /kəˈmɝː.ʃəl/
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"commercial" in Business English

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commercialadjective

uk   /kəˈmɜːʃəl/ us   COMMERCE
relating to businesses and their activities: Planning issues continue to stall the company's proposed commercial development. commercial sales/services/transactions etc.
used to describe a product or service that can be bought by the public: The airport handles 663 commercial flights a day.
[before noun] for making a profit or relating to making a profit: The business was never intended to be a commercial enterprise.commercial success/value Some traditional producers are finally enjoying commercial success.
[before noun] used to describe radio or television that is paid for by the advertisements it broadcasts: The commission, which licenses and regulates commercial TV, ordered the ad off air.
disapproving used to describe a product, especially a record, film, or book, which is made to make a profit rather than be of a high artistic quality: Their music is a little too commercial for me.

commercialnoun [C]

uk   /kəˈmɜːʃəl/ us  
MARKETING an advertisement that is broadcast on television or radio: American manufacturers have produced a series of TV commercials highlighting manufacturing successes.
commercials
STOCK MARKET shares in a company that sells goods to consumers: Commercials ended the year down 3.5%.
(Definition of commercial from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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