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Definition of “common” - English Dictionary

"common" in American English

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commonadjective

 us   /ˈkɑm·ən/
  • common adjective (USUAL)

foundfrequently in many ​places or among many ​people: Money ​worries are a common ​problem for ​peopleraisingchildren.
  • common adjective (SHARED)

[not gradable] belonging to or ​shared by two or more ​people or things: Guilt and ​forgiveness are ​themes common to all of her ​works.
commonly
adverb  us   /ˈkɑm·ən·li/
"The" is the most commonly used word in ​English.

commonnoun [C]

 us   /ˈkɑm·ən/
  • common noun [C] (LAND)

an ​area of ​grassyland that is ​open for everyone to use, usually near the ​center of a ​town or ​city: The Boston Common is the ​oldestpark in the US.
(Definition of common from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"common" in British English

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commonadjective

uk   /ˈkɒm.ən/  us   /ˈkɑː.mən/
  • common adjective (USUAL)

B1 the same in a lot of ​places or for a lot of ​people: It's ​quite common to ​seecouples who ​dressalike. "Smith" is a very common ​name in ​Britain.common courtesy/decency the ​basiclevel of ​politeness that you ​expect from someonecommon knowledge B2 a ​fact that everyone ​knows: [+ that] It's common ​knowledge that they ​live together.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • common adjective (SHARED)

B1 belonging to or ​shared by two or more ​people, or things: a common ​goal/​interest English has some ​features common to many ​languages.
See also
for the common good If something is done for the common good, it is done to ​help everyone.make common cause with sb formal to ​act together with someone in ​order to ​achieve something: Environmental ​protesters have made common ​cause with ​localpeople to ​stop the ​motorway being ​built.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • common adjective (LOW CLASS)

disapproving typical of a ​lowsocialclass: My ​mumthinksdyedblondehair is a ​bit common.

commonnoun

uk   /ˈkɒm.ən/  us   /ˈkɑː.mən/
  • common noun (LAND)

[C] (US also commons) an ​area of ​grass that everyone is ​allowed to use, usually in or near a ​village
  • common noun (SHARED)

have sth in common B1 to ​shareinterests, ​experiences, or other ​characteristics with someone or something: We don't really have much in common.in common with sb/sth C1 in the same way as someone or something: In common with many ​mothers, she ​feelstorn between her ​family and her ​work.
(Definition of common from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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