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Definition of “complete” - English Dictionary

"complete" in American English

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completeadjective

us   /kəmˈplit/
  • complete adjective (WHOLE)

containing all the parts or pieces; whole: a complete set of dishes the complete works of Dickens We wanted a complete record of what everyone said.
  • complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

very great, without limit, or to the largest degree possible: The trip began in complete confusion. She gave me a look of complete indifference. Toby and Alfredo are complete opposites.
completely
adverb us   /kəmˈplit·li/
To be completely honest, I was too scared to say anything.

completeverb [T]

us   /kəmˈplit/
  • complete verb [T] (FINISH)

to finish doing something: John has completed 15 marathons. She completed three years of college, and then took a year off.
  • complete verb [T] (MAKE WHOLE)

to supply all the parts or pieces needed to make something whole: She needed one more course to complete the requirements for a teaching degree.
completion
noun [U] us   /kəmˈpli·ʃən/
He was the architect who supervised the completion of the hotel.
(Definition of complete from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"complete" in British English

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completeverb [T]

uk   /kəmˈpliːt/ us   /kəmˈpliːt/
  • complete verb [T] (MAKE WHOLE)

A2 to make whole or perfect: Complete the sentence with one of the adjectives provided. He only needs two more cards to complete the set. All she needed to complete her happiness was a baby.
A2 to write all the details asked for on a form or other document: Have you completed your application form yet?

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  • complete verb [T] (FINISH)

A2 to finish doing something: He's just completed filming his 17th feature film. The palace took over 20 years to complete. She will complete her studies in France.

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completeadjective

uk   /kəmˈpliːt/ us   /kəmˈpliːt/
  • complete adjective (VERY GREAT)

B1 [before noun] very great or to the largest degree possible: The man's a complete fool! I need a break, a complete change of scene. I made a complete and utter mess of it!

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  • complete adjective (WHOLE)

B1 with all the parts: the complete works of Oscar Wilde The report comes complete with (= including) diagrams and colour photographs. Sun, sand, and romance - her holiday was complete.

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(Definition of complete from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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