compound Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “compound” - English Dictionary

Definition of "compound" - American English Dictionary

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compoundnoun [C]

 us   /ˈkɑm·pɑʊnd/

compound noun [C] (COMBINATION)

a ​mixture of two or more different ​parts or ​elements: His ​jokes have been ​described as a compound of ​fears, anxieties, and insecurities. chemistry A compound is a ​chemicalsubstance that ​combines two or more ​elements. grammar A compound is a word consisting of two or more words: "​Blackeye" and "​teaspoon" are compounds.

compound noun [C] (AREA)

a ​fenced or ​enclosedarea that ​containsbuildings: We ​left the compound early to ​find and ​photographwildanimals.

compoundverb [T]

 us   /kɑmˈpɑʊnd, ˈkɑm·pɑʊnd/
to make something ​worse by ​increasing or ​adding to it: Lack of ​rain compounded the ​problems farmers are having.
(Definition of compound from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "compound" - British English Dictionary

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compoundnoun [C]

uk   /ˈkɒm.paʊnd/  us   /ˈkɑːm-/

compound noun [C] (COMBINATION)

specialized chemistry a ​chemical that ​combines two or more ​elements: Salt is a compound ofsodium and ​chlorine. Many ​fertilizerscontainnitrogen compounds. formal something consisting of two or more different ​parts: Then there was his ​manner, a ​curious compound of ​humour and ​severity. specialized language a word that ​combines two or more different words. Often, the ​meaning of the compound cannot be ​discovered by ​knowing the ​meaning of the different words that ​form it. Compounds may be written either as one word or as ​separate words: 'Bodyguard' and '​floppydisk' are two ​examples of compounds.

compound noun [C] (AREA)

an ​areasurrounded by ​fences or ​walls that ​contains a ​group of ​buildings: The ​gatesopened and the ​troopsmarched into ​their compound. The ​embassy compound has been ​closed to the ​public because of a ​bombthreat.
Grammar

compoundverb

uk   us   /kəmˈpaʊnd/

compound verb (WORSEN)

[T often passive] to make a ​problem or ​difficultsituationworse: Her ​terror was compounded by the ​feeling that she was being ​watched. His ​financialproblems were compounded when he ​unexpectedlylost his ​job. Severe ​drought has compounded ​foodshortages in the ​region.

compound verb (COMBINE)

[T] to ​mix two things together: Most ​tyres are made of ​rubber compounded with other ​chemicals and ​materials.

compoundadjective

uk   /ˈkɒm.paʊnd/  us   /ˈkɑːm-/
consisting of two or more ​parts specialized finance & economics used to refer to a ​system of ​payinginterest in which ​interest is ​paid both on the ​originalamount of ​money invested (= given to ​companieshoping to get more back) or ​borrowed and on the ​interest that has ​collected over a ​period of ​time: compound ​interest The ​investmentfund has ​achievedannual compound ​returns of 18.2 ​percent.
Grammar
(Definition of compound from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "compound" - Business English Dictionary

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compoundadjective

uk   us   /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/ FINANCE
used to describe a ​system of ​calculatinginterest in which it is ​paid on both the ​amount of ​moneyinvested or ​borrowed and on the ​interest that has been ​added to it: The ​investment has ​grown $1,000 into $3,552 over five ​years, a compound ​annualreturn of 28.6%.

compoundverb [T]

uk   us   /kəmˈpaʊnd/ FINANCE
to ​calculateinterest on both the ​amount of ​moneyinvested or ​borrowed and on the ​interest that has been ​added to it: Interest will be compounded every six months.
(Definition of compound from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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