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Definition of “consider” - English Dictionary

"consider" in American English

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considerverb [T]

 us   /kənˈsɪd·ər/
  • consider verb [T] (THINK ABOUT)

to think about a particular subject or thing or about doing something or about whether to do something: Consider Clara Barton, who founded the American Red Cross. We considered moving to California, but decided not to. [+ question word] We have to consider what to do next.
  • consider verb [T] (CARE ABOUT)

to care about or respect: Before raising the admission prices, consider the fans.
  • consider verb [T] (HAVE AN OPINION)

to believe to be; to think of as: What some people would consider a personal attack, Andy considers a friendly discussion.
(Definition of consider from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"consider" in British English

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considerverb

uk   /kənˈsɪd.ər/  us   /kənˈsɪd.ɚ/
  • consider verb (POSSIBILITY)

B1 [I or T] to spend time thinking about a possibility or making a decision: Don't make any decisions before you've considered the situation. [+ question word] Have you considered what you'll do if you don't get the job? [+ -ing verb] We're considering selling the house. She's being considered for the job. I'd like some time to consider before I make a decision.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • consider verb (SUBJECT/FACT)

C1 [T] to give attention to a particular subject or fact when judging something else: You've got to consider the time element when planning the whole project. [+ question word] If you consider how long he's been learning the piano, he's not very good.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • consider verb (OPINION)

B2 [T often + obj + (to be) + noun/adj] to believe someone or something to be, or think of him, her, or it as something: He is currently considered (to be) the best British athlete. We don't consider her to be right for the job. [passive + obj + to infinitive ] It is considered bad manners in some cultures to speak with your mouth full of food. I consider myself lucky that I only hurt my arm in the accident. Do you consider him a friend of yours? [+ (that)] She considers (that) she has done enough to help already.
be highly/well considered
to be very much admired: I don't like her books, but I know she's very highly considered.
(Definition of consider from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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