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Definition of “construction” - English Dictionary

"construction" in American English

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constructionnoun

 us   /kənˈstrʌk·ʃən/
[U] the ​act or ​result of putting different things together: A new ​hotel is now under construction (= being ​built).
[C] fml yourunderstanding of the ​meaning of something in a ​particular way: The construction you are putting on my client’s ​statement is ​unfair.
(Definition of construction from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"construction" in British English

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constructionnoun

uk   /kənˈstrʌk.ʃən/  us   /kənˈstrʌk.ʃən/
  • construction noun (BUILDING)

B2 [U] the ​work of ​building or making something, ​especiallybuildings, ​bridges, etc.: She ​works in construction/in the construction industry. The ​bridge is a ​marvellouswork of ​engineering and construction. This ​website is ​currently under construction (= being ​created).
[U] the ​particulartype of ​structure, ​materials, etc. that something has: The ​bridge is of ​lightweight construction.
B2 [C] a ​building: What's that ​concrete and ​metal construction over there?

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  • construction noun (LANGUAGE)

B2 [C] specialized language the way in which the words in a ​sentence or phrase are ​arranged: The ​writer has used several ​complexgrammatical constructions.
put a construction on sth formal
to ​understand something in a ​particular way: How can they put such a ​damning construction on a ​perfectlyinnocent phrase?
to ​understand something as having a ​particularmeaning, ​especially other people's ​actions and ​statements: I don't ​want them to put the ​wrong construction on my ​actions.
(Definition of construction from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"construction" in Business English

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constructionnoun

uk   us   /kənˈstrʌkʃən/
[U] the ​process or ​business of ​building large ​objects such as ​buildings, roads, bridges, etc.: Employment in construction ​increased by 12,000.a construction site/project/worker 29-year-old Jose has a well-paid ​job at a ​downtown construction ​site.under construction In February, there were 15% fewer homes under construction than in the ​corresponding month of last ​year. a construction ​company/​firm/​group the construction ​industry/​sector
[U] PRODUCTION the ​activity of putting the different ​parts of something together in ​order to make it: The ​chemical is ​found in ​materials used in the construction of ​traveltrailers.under construction They now have four ​satellites under construction. the construction of an ​investmentportfolio
[U] the particular ​type of ​structure, ​materials, etc. that something has: The ​bridge is of ​lightweight construction.
[C] a ​building or other ​object that has been ​built: The new ​officebuilding was a glass and ​steel construction.
(Definition of construction from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“construction” in Business English

Just who is driving this thing?
Just who is driving this thing?
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by Colin McIntosh Do you remember Herbie the Love Bug? Herbie was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle car in a string of Walt Disney movies. In typical Disney anthropomorphic style, Herbie goes his own way, falls in love, cries, plays jokes, and generally has a mind of his own. While the new driverless cars, like those being

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