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Definition of “continue” - English Dictionary

"continue" in American English

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continueverb [I/T]

us   /kənˈtɪn·ju/
to keep happening or to keep doing something without stopping: [+ to infinitive] If it continues to rain, we may have to cancel the outdoor concert. [+ to infinitive] I will continue to say what I believe. They continued hoping there would be additional survivors.
You can also continue to do something or continue doing something if you start to do it again after a pause: [T] After a break for lunch, they continued their discussions.
(Definition of continue from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"continue" in British English

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continueverb

uk   /kənˈtɪn.juː/ us   /kənˈtɪn.juː/
B1 [I or T] to keep happening, existing, or doing something, or to cause something or someone to do this: [+ to infinitive] It's said that as the boat went down the band continued to play. [+ -ing verb] If she continues drinking like that, I'll have to carry her home. Do you intend to continue (with) your studies? If the rain continues, we'll have to cancel tonight's plans. Sally Palmer will be continuing as chairperson this autumn. The article continues/is continued on page ten.
B1 [I] to start to do something again after a pause: After stopping for a quick drink, they continued on their way. [+ -ing verb] He paused for a moment to listen and then continued eating. The president continued by saying that his country was a free country and would always remain so. [+ speech] "I don't like your weather!" she shouted, "and I don't," she continued, "like your food!"

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(Definition of continue from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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