core Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “core” - English Dictionary

Definition of "core" - American English Dictionary

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corenoun [C]

 us   /kɔr, koʊr/

core noun [C] (FRUIT)

the hard, ​centralpart of some ​fruits, such as ​apples, which ​contains the ​seeds

core noun [C] (CENTER)

the ​center or most ​importantpart of something: Farmers ​formed the core of ​traditionalpartysupport. Safety ​concerns are at the core of the new ​federalpolicies. earth science The core of the ​earth is ​itscenter, made up of a ​liquidinner core and a ​solidouter core.

coreadjective [not gradable]

 us   /kɔr, koʊr/

core adjective [not gradable] (CENTRAL)

central; ​basic: We ​want to ​appeal to ​our core ​supporters without ​turning off ​undecidedvoters. The ​notion of ​love is one of the core ​values of ​ourcivilization. We have to ​concentrate on the core ​business, ​management said.

coreverb [T]

 us   /kɔr, koʊr/

core verb [T] (FRUIT)

to ​remove the core of ​fruit
(Definition of core from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "core" - British English Dictionary

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corenoun

uk   /kɔːr/  us   /kɔːr/

core noun (IMPORTANT PART)

C2 [S or U] the ​basic and most ​importantpart of something: The ​lack of ​governmentfunding is at the core of the ​problem.
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core noun (CENTRE)

C2 [C] the hard ​centralpart of some ​fruits, such as ​apples, that ​contains the ​seeds: Don't ​throwyourapple core on the ​floor! [C] the ​centre of a ​planet: The earth's core is a ​hot, ​moltenmix of ​iron and ​nickel. [C] specialized physics The core of a nuclear reactor (= a ​device in which ​atoms are ​changed to ​produceenergy) is the ​place where fission (= the ​dividing of ​atoms)happens. [C] specialized geology a ​long, ​thin cylinder-shaped ​mass of ​material taken out of the ​earth for ​study

coreadjective

uk   /kɔːr/  us   /kɔːr/

core adjective (IMPORTANT)

most ​important or most ​basic: They are ​cutting back ​production of some of ​their core ​products.core value, belief, issue, etc. a ​value, ​belief, etc. that is ​basic and more ​important than any other: The ​finalstatusnegotiations would ​focus on the core ​issues of the ​peaceprocess.core business/operations/activities the most ​important or ​largestpart of a company's ​businessactivities: The company's core ​operationsincludeentertainment and ​aviation.core curriculum/subjects/courses the most ​importantparts of a ​course of ​study, that all ​students must ​learn found in the ​mainpart of the ​body, but not the ​arms or the ​legs: Pilates is good for ​strengthening the core ​muscles.

coreverb [T]

uk   /kɔːr/  us   /kɔːr/
to ​remove the core from a ​piece of ​fruit: Peel and core the ​pears before ​cooking them.
(Definition of core from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "core" - Business English Dictionary

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corenoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /kɔːr/
the most important or most basic ​part of something: the core of sth The core of the bank's ​business is in Hong Kong.be at the core of sth The ​internet is ​increasingly at the core of the ​telecomsbusiness.

coreadjective [usually before noun]

uk   us   /kɔːr/
most important: core ​activities/​operationscore products/services They are ​cutting back ​production of some of their core ​products. core ​customers/​workerscore values For a ​company to ​achieve a ​competitiveadvantage it is important to have core ​values and a clearly ​definedpurpose. a core ​market/​business
(Definition of core from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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