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Definition of “count” - English Dictionary

"count" in American English

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countverb

 us   /kɑʊnt/
  • count verb (CALCULATE)

[I/T] to say the ​names of ​numbers one after the other in ​order, or to ​calculate the ​number of ​units in a ​group: [I] By the ​time I count to three, you’d ​better be in ​bed. [T] The ​teachers counted the ​students as they ​boarded the ​bus. [T] There’ll be eight for ​dinner, counting (= ​including) us. [+ question word] Can you count how many ​pencils are ​left?
  • count verb (CONSIDER)

[I/T] to ​consider or be ​considered as: [T] He counts Lucy as one of his ​closestfriends. [I] Does ​homework count toward my ​grade?
  • count verb (VALUE)

[I] to have ​value or ​importance: I’ve always ​believed that ​happiness counts more than ​money.

countnoun

 us   /kɑʊnt/
  • count noun (CRIME)

[C] law a ​separateitemincluded in a ​criminalaccusation against someone: She was ​foundguilty on two counts of ​fraud.
  • count noun (OPINION)

[C usually pl] a ​statement of ​belief in a ​discussion or ​argument: I ​think you’re ​wrong on all counts.
  • count noun (CALCULATION)

[C/U] a ​calculation, esp. a ​scientific one, of the ​number of ​units in a ​group: a ​lowblood count [C] We need a count of the ​number of ​e-mailinquiries.
(Definition of count from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"count" in British English

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countverb

uk   /kaʊnt/  us   /kaʊnt/
  • count verb (NUMBER)

B1 [I or T] to say ​numbers one after the other in ​order, or to ​calculate the ​number of ​people or things in a ​group: Let's count out ​loud (= ​speak the words) from one to ten. The ​teachers counted the ​students as they got on to the ​bus. Count ​yourmoneycarefully to make ​sure it's all there. [+ question word] We need to count who's here, so we can make ​sure that no one's ​missing. There'll be eight for ​dinner, counting (= ​including) ourselves. We're still ​waiting for the ​votes to be counted (up).
count heads
to count the ​number of ​peoplepresentsomewhere: There ​look to be about 50 ​people here - I haven't counted ​headsyet.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • count verb (HAVE VALUE)

B2 [I] to have ​value or ​importance: I've always ​believed that ​happiness counts more than ​money. My ​opinion doesn't count for anything around here (= no one ​values my ​opinion).
Synonym

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • count verb (CONSIDER)

C2 [I or T] to ​consider or be ​considered as: I count myselffortunate to have had such a good ​education. I've had three ​jobs in the last five ​years, but one of them was ​unpaid, so it doesn't count (= cannot be ​considered as a ​realjob). I've always counted Sophia among my ​closestfriends. I didn't ​think his ​grudgingremarks really counted as an ​apology.

countnoun

uk   /kaʊnt/  us   /kaʊnt/
  • count noun (NUMBER)

C2 [C] the ​act of counting, or the ​totalnumber of things counted: Early ​vote counts show Mr Adams in the ​lead. We had 450 ​members at the last count (= when they were last counted).
keep count
to ​record how many of something there are, or how many ​times something has ​happened: So many ​peopleasked us for ​help, it was hard to ​keep count.
lose count
C2 to not be ​able to ​remember how many ​times something has ​happened: I've ​lost count of how many ​times she's been late for ​work this ​month.
[C] a ​scientificallymeasuredamount of something: a high ​pollen count a ​lowblood/​sperm count
on the count of three, four, five, etc.
when a ​particularnumber is ​reached: On the count of three, I'd like you all to ​stand up.
  • count noun (RANK)

[C] a ​European man of the same ​socialrank as an ​Englishearl
See also
(Definition of count from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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