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Definition of “count” - English Dictionary

"count" in American English

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countverb

 us   /kɑʊnt/
  • count verb (CALCULATE)

[I/T] to say the names of numbers one after the other in order, or to calculate the number of units in a group: [I] By the time I count to three, you’d better be in bed. [T] The teachers counted the students as they boarded the bus. [T] There’ll be eight for dinner, counting (= including) us. [+ question word] Can you count how many pencils are left?
  • count verb (CONSIDER)

[I/T] to consider or be considered as: [T] He counts Lucy as one of his closest friends. [I] Does homework count toward my grade?
  • count verb (VALUE)

[I] to have value or importance: I’ve always believed that happiness counts more than money.

countnoun

 us   /kɑʊnt/
  • count noun (CRIME)

[C] law a separate item included in a criminal accusation against someone: She was found guilty on two counts of fraud.
  • count noun (OPINION)

[C usually pl] a statement of belief in a discussion or argument: I think you’re wrong on all counts.
  • count noun (CALCULATION)

[C/U] a calculation, esp. a scientific one, of the number of units in a group: a low blood count [C] We need a count of the number of e-mail inquiries.
(Definition of count from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"count" in British English

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countverb

uk   /kaʊnt/  us   /kaʊnt/
  • count verb (NUMBER)

B1 [I or T] to say numbers one after the other in order, or to calculate the number of people or things in a group: Let's count out loud (= speak the words) from one to ten. The teachers counted the students as they got on to the bus. Count your money carefully to make sure it's all there. [+ question word] We need to count who's here, so we can make sure that no one's missing. There'll be eight for dinner, counting (= including) ourselves. We're still waiting for the votes to be counted (up).
count heads
to count the number of people present somewhere: There look to be about 50 people here - I haven't counted heads yet.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • count verb (HAVE VALUE)

B2 [I] to have value or importance: I've always believed that happiness counts more than money. My opinion doesn't count for anything around here (= no one values my opinion).
Synonym

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

countnoun

uk   /kaʊnt/  us   /kaʊnt/
  • count noun (NUMBER)

C2 [C] the act of counting, or the total number of things counted: Early vote counts show Mr Adams in the lead. We had 450 members at the last count (= when they were last counted).
keep count
to record how many of something there are, or how many times something has happened: So many people asked us for help, it was hard to keep count.
lose count
C2 to not be able to remember how many times something has happened: I've lost count of how many times she's been late for work this month.
[C] a scientifically measured amount of something: a high pollen count a low blood/sperm count
on the count of three, four, five, etc.
when a particular number is reached: On the count of three, I'd like you all to stand up.
  • count noun (RANK)

[C] a European man of the same social rank as an English earl
See also
(Definition of count from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
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May 24, 2016
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