counter Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “counter” - English Dictionary

"counter" in American English

See all translations

counternoun [C]

us   /ˈkɑʊn·tər/
  • counter noun [C] (SURFACE)

a long, flat, narrow surface in a store, bank, restaurant, etc., at which people are served: He sat down at the counter of the diner and ordered a cup of coffee.
A counter is also a flat surface in a kitchen on which food can be prepared.

counterverb [I/T]

us   /ˈkɑʊn·tər/
  • counter verb [I/T] (OPPOSE)

to react to something with an opposing opinion or action; to defend yourself against something: [T] To counter the inaccuracies in the movie, researchers used computer models to project climate changes.

counteradverb [not gradable]

us   /ˈkɑʊn·tər/
in a way that opposes an opinion or action: David’s decision to drop out of school to write plays ran counter to (= was directly opposite to) his parent’s expectations.
(Definition of counter from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"counter" in British English

See all translations

counternoun [C]

uk   /ˈkaʊn.tər/ us   /ˈkaʊn.t̬ɚ/
  • counter noun [C] (SURFACE)

B2 a long, flat, narrow surface or table in a shop, bank, restaurant, etc. at which people are served: There was nobody behind/on the counter when I went into the bank, and I had to wait to be served. You will find sausages on the meat counter/rolls on the bread counter.
mainly US UK usually worktop, work surface a kitchen counter : We stacked the dirty plates on the kitchen counter.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • counter noun [C] (DOING COUNTING)

a person or machine that counts

counterverb [I or T]

uk   /ˈkaʊn.tər/ us   /ˈkaʊn.t̬ɚ/
to react to something with an opposing opinion or action, or to defend yourself against something: After the government bombed their camp, the rebels countered with an attack on the capital. When criticisms were made of the school's performance, the parents' group countered with details of its exam results. Extra police have been moved into the area to counter the risk of violence.

counteradverb

uk   /ˈkaʊn.tər/ us   /ˈkaʊn.t̬ɚ/
C2 in a way that opposes something: Bob's decision not to take the job ran counter to his family's expectations.

counter-prefix

uk   /kaʊn.tər-/ us   /kaʊn.t̬ɚ-/
(Definition of counter from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"counter" in Business English

See all translations

counternoun [C]

uk   /ˈkaʊntər/ us   COMMERCE
the place where customers go to be served or to buy goods in a store: Please pay at the counter. You will find rolls on the bread counter. the checkout counter He serves behind the counter at the local deli.
across/over the counter
goods or services that are sold or available over the counter can be bought or obtained without needing official permission, for example, from a doctor or someone in authority: Bonds are sold over the counter, with prices quoted privately to the client. Regulators declined permission for the remedy to be sold over the counter.
under the counter
goods or services that are sold or available under the counter can be bought or obtained secretly and sometimes illegally: Pirate DVDs are available under the counter in pubs and clubs everywhere. under-the-counter deals
(Definition of counter from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of counter?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“counter” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

Read More 

Word of the Day

environment

the air, water, and land in or on which people, animals, and plants live

Word of the Day

decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
May 30, 2016
a decreased ability to make decisions as a result of having too many decisions to make Our brains have a finite number of decisions they can make before they get depleted and become less discerning – so this is called decision fatigue.

Read More