cover Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “cover” - English Dictionary

Definition of "cover" - American English Dictionary

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coververb

 us   /ˈkʌv·ər/

cover verb (PLACE OVER)

[T] to put or ​spread something over something, or to ​lie on the ​surface of something: Once the ​rice comes to a ​boil, ​turn down the ​flame and cover the ​pot. She covered the ​child with a ​blanket. [T] If something covers an ​area of a ​particularsize, it is ​equal to an ​area of that ​size: Grand Canyon ​National Park covers over a million ​acres.

cover verb (TRAVEL)

[T] to ​travel a ​particulardistance: We covered 600 ​miles in the last two ​days. fig. Her ​lecture covered a lot of ​ground, from Renaissance ​art to ​modernart.

cover verb (INCLUDE)

[T] to ​deal with or ​include someone or something: The ​travelguide covers all the ​museums and ​historicplaces.

cover verb (REPORT)

[T] to ​report or write about a ​particularsubject for a ​newspaper, ​magazine, ​television, or ​radio: Harold covers ​sports for the Times, and Joan covers real-estate developments.

cover verb (BE ENOUGH)

[T] to be enough ​money to ​pay for: Will $150 cover ​yourexpenses?

cover verb (PROTECT)

[T] to ​protect someone or something from ​financialloss, ​damage, ​accident, or having something ​stolen; to insure : Our ​carinsurance covers us up to $250,000 for ​personalinjury.

cover verb (DO JOB)

[I always + adv/prep] to do a ​job or duty for someone who is ​absent: Can you cover for me while I'm at the ​dentist on ​Monday?

cover verb (TAKE CARE OF)

[T] to ​deal with or take ​care of something: Could you cover the ​phones while I’m away from the ​office?

covernoun

 us   /ˈkʌv·ər/

cover noun (SHELTER)

[U] shelter or ​protection, esp. in a ​dangeroussituation: Folks ​heard the ​storm was coming and took cover.

cover noun (PLACE OVER)

[C] something that is ​placed over something, often for ​protection, or that ​lies over something ​else to ​form a ​layer: I ​keep my ​computerprinter under a ​plastic cover. [C] The cover of a ​book or ​magazine is the ​stiff, ​outsidepart of it, usually made of ​thickpaper or ​cardboard. [C] A cover is also a ​layer of a ​material used to ​keep a ​person in ​bedwarm: [pl] On ​colddays, she ​pulled the covers up to her ​chin.
(Definition of cover from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "cover" - British English Dictionary

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coververb

uk   /ˈkʌv.ər/  us   //

cover verb (PLACE OVER)

A2 [T] to put or ​spread something over something, or to ​lie on the ​surface of something: The ​light was so ​bright that I had to cover my ​eyes. Snow covered the ​hillsides. She covered him (up) with a ​blanket. Cover the ​meat with a ​layer of ​cheese. The ​bandages were covered with/inblood. How much of the earth's ​surface is covered by/withwater?
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cover verb (DEAL WITH)

B1 [T] to ​deal with or ​directattention to something: This ​leaflet covers what we've just ​discussed in more ​detail. Do these ​parkingrestrictions cover ​residents as well as ​visitors? The salesman's ​territory covers the ​whole of the ​southeast.
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cover verb (REPORT)

C1 [T] to ​report the ​news about a ​particularimportantevent: She's covering the American ​election for BBC ​television.
More examples
  • The ​story wasn't covered on the ​nationalnews.
  • He was in Greece covering the Olympics.
  • He was ​sent to Russia to cover the ​elections there.

cover verb (PROTECT)

C1 [T] to ​protect someone against ​loss, ​damage, ​accident, or having something ​stolen, by having insurance: Does ​yourtravelinsurance cover you against/for the ​loss or ​theft of ​cash?cover yourself to do something to ​protect yourself from ​blame or ​criticism in the ​future: I ​keptcopies of my ​expensereceipts, just to cover myself.
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cover verb (TRAVEL)

B2 [T] to ​travel a ​particulardistance: We covered 400 km in three ​hours.

cover verb (BE ENOUGH)

C1 [T] to be enough ​money to ​pay for something: The ​sellingpricebarely covered the ​cost of the ​rawmaterials. Would £50 cover ​yourexpenses?

cover verb (GIVE PROTECTION)

[T] to ​aim a ​gun or ​shoot at someone to ​try to ​stop them from ​shooting or ​escaping, or to ​protect someone ​else: The ​policeofficer was covered by her ​colleagues while she ​ran towards the gunman's ​hideout. [T] When ​soldiers or ​policeofficers cover a ​place such as a ​road or ​building, they are in a ​position from which they can ​watch and ​defend it: All the ​exits are covered, so they can't ​escape.

cover verb (SPORTS)

[T] US (UK mark) to ​prevent a ​member of the ​opposingteam from taking ​control of the ​ball by ​stayingclose to them all the ​time

cover verb (DO SOMEONE'S JOB)

[I or T] to do someone else's ​job or ​duty when they are ​absent: I'm going to the doctor's ​tomorrow, so do you ​think you could cover my ​shift for me? Sorry, I'm already covering for someone ​else.

cover verb (RECORD)

[T] to make a ​recording of a ​song or ​tune that has already been ​recorded by someone ​else: I ​think more ​singers have covered "Yesterday" than any other ​song.
Phrasal verbs

covernoun

uk   /ˈkʌv.ər/  us   //

cover noun (SOMETHING PLACED OVER)

B1 [C] something that is put on or over something ​else, usually to ​protect it, to ​keep something in, etc.: I ​keep my ​computerprinter under a ​protectiveplastic cover. Remove the ​packaging and ​pierce the ​plastic cover before microwaving.B1 [C] the ​stiffoutsidepart of a ​book or ​magazine, usually made of ​thickpaper or ​cardboard: Who should we put on the cover of the ​magazine this ​month? Paperback ​books have ​soft covers.read sth from cover to cover to ​read a ​book, ​magazine, etc. all the way through from the ​beginning to the end [C] Indian English an ​envelopesend sth under plain/separate cover formal to ​send something in a ​plain/​separateenvelopecovers [plural] the blankets, sheets , etc. on a ​bed: Martha ​threw back the covers and ​bounced out of ​bed.
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cover noun (PROTECTION)

C1 [U] shelter or ​protection in an ​unpleasant or ​dangeroussituation: We took cover from the ​storm in a ​busshelter. The ​burglarbroke into the ​house under cover of ​darkness. [U] plants, ​especiallybushes, that are used as ​shelter by ​animals [U] protection by someone who has a ​gun: We ​needed more cover from the ​enemyaircraft.C1 UK (US coverage) [U] financialprotection so that you get ​money if something ​badhappens: I've got £20,000 ​worth of cover for the ​contents of my ​house. Do you have cover foraccidentaldamage?
Synonym

cover noun (SONG)

[C] (also cover version) a ​performance or ​recording of a ​song or ​tune that has already been ​recorded by someone ​else: How many cover ​versions have been made of "My Way"?
(Definition of cover from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "cover" - Business English Dictionary

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coververb

uk   us   /ˈkʌvər/
[T] to ​include or ​deal with something: The ​seminars cover such topics as making an ​impact at ​interview, employability, and what ​companies are looking for. Have I covered all your ​questions?
COMMERCE to ​servecustomers in a particular ​area: Our ​deliveryservice covers the entire metropolitan ​area.
[T] FINANCE to be enough ​money to ​pay for something: My wife ​earns enough to cover the ​mortgage. We only ​sold enough to cover our ​costs - we made no ​profit at all. The ​amount was not sufficient to cover all his ​debts. The government's ​guarantee will cover the first £50,000 of people's ​savings.
[I or T] INSURANCE to ​protect someone or something against ​loss, ​damage, accident, etc., by ​insurance: The ​policy covers ​employee and ​publicliability, ​equipmentloss, ​materials, and ​personal accidents.cover (sb) against/for sth In ​general, ​buildingsinsurance covers (you) against ​damage to the ​house itself and outbuildings such as conservatories and greenhouses.
[T] to ​protect yourself from being blamed for something: cover yourself (against something) Always ​inform a ​seniorcolleague of your intentions, in ​order to cover yourself against accusations of bullying.
[T] FINANCE if a ​financialorganization can cover a ​loan, it is ​protected against ​loss by having enough collateral (= ​property that a ​personborrowingmoneyagrees to give to the ​organization if they ​fail to ​pay the ​debt): The ​approval for a ​homeequityloan is usually ​easy as the ​lender has ​collateral to cover the ​loanamount.
[T] FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​buyshares, currency, etc. that you have ​arranged to ​sell in the future, especially if the ​price is ​rising and you had expected it to go down: Tokyo ​stocksadvanced 1.1% Thursday as ​futuresrose and ​investors scrambled to cover ​shortpositions.
[I or T] HR to do someone else's ​job when they are ​absent: cover (for sb) We are expected to cover for each other if someone is ​absent or is late arriving in the morning. While he was on ​sickleave, a ​colleague covered his ​job.

covernoun

uk   us   /ˈkʌvər/
[C] the ​stiff outside ​part of a ​book or ​magazine: She became the first woman to appear on the cover of Business Week.
[U] UK (also insurance cover, US coverage) INSURANCE financialprotection against ​loss, ​damage, ​injury, etc., which an ​insurancecompanysells: health/liability/life/travel cover A ​firmemployingstaffneeds to have ​employers' ​liability cover.buy/get/take out cover (for/against sth) Homeworkers can get ​insurance cover for ​copiers and ​faxes but ​premiumcostsvary widely.provide cover (for/against sth) The ​policyprovides cover for ​loss or ​damage to ​propertyowned by the ​insured. For a ​smalladditionalpremium, you can ​increase this cover to £100,000.
[U] FINANCE the fact of being enough to ​pay for something: The ​property that is being ​offered as ​collateral will be sufficient cover for the ​loanamount.
[U] HR the ​situation in which someone does someone else's ​job when they are ​absent: Employees need cover for days they have to ​stayhome to ​care for ​sick children.
(Definition of cover from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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