credit Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “credit” - English Dictionary

Definition of "credit" - American English Dictionary

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creditnoun

 us   /ˈkred·ɪt/

credit noun (PAYMENT LATER)

[U] a ​method of ​buyinggoods or ​services that ​allows you to ​pay for them in the ​future: We ​boughtoursofa on credit. The ​bankofferssmallbusinesses credit.

credit noun (PRAISE)

[C/U] praise or ​approval, esp. to ​recognizeachievement: [U] You have to give him credit for being so ​honest. [U] How can he take credit for ​work he didn’t do?

credit noun (MONEY AVAILABLE)

[C/U] an ​amount of ​moneyavailable to you because you ​paid for something ​earlier, or a ​record of this ​money: [C] We ​returned the ​clothes and got a ​store credit. [C/U] A credit is also an ​amount of ​money you do not have to ​pay: [C] a ​tax credit

credit noun (COURSE UNIT)

[C] a ​unit of ​measurement of the ​valuecontributed by an ​educationalcourse to a ​collegedegree: Comparative ​religion is a three-credit ​course.

creditverb [T]

 us   /ˈkred·ət/

credit verb [T] (BELIEVE)

to ​believe or ​trust something that may not be ​true: If you can credit what the ​doctor says, the ​illness isn’t ​serious.
creditable
adjective  us   /ˈkred·ət̬·ə·bəl/
She gave a creditable ​performance of a woman in ​love.
(Definition of credit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "credit" - British English Dictionary

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creditnoun

uk   us   /ˈkred.ɪt/

credit noun (PRAISE)

B2 [U] praise, ​approval, or ​honour: She got no credit for ​solving the ​problem. Her ​boss took credit for it/took (all) the credit ​instead. To her (​great) credit, she ​admitted she was ​wrong. I gave him credit for (= ​thought that he would have)betterjudgment than he ​showed.be a credit to sb/sth to do something that makes a ​person, ​group, or ​organizationfeelproud or ​receivepraise: She is a credit to her ​family.do your family, parents, teacher, etc. credit to ​cause someone who has been or is ​responsible for you to ​receivepraise by ​your good ​behaviour or ​successfulactions: She does her ​teachers credit.all credit to sb used to show that you ​think a ​persondeserves a lot of ​praise for something that they have done: All credit to her, she did it all herself.
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credit noun (MONEY)

B1 [U] a ​method of ​paying for ​goods or ​services at a ​latertime, usually ​payinginterest as well as the ​originalmoney: They ​decided to ​buy the ​car on credit. The ​shop was ​offering six ​months' (interest-free) credit onelectronicgoods.
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B1 [C or U] money in ​yourbankaccount: I was ​relieved to ​see from my ​statement that my ​account was in credit.
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  • Her credit is good .
  • Now I've ​paid in that ​cheque, I'm in credit again.

credit noun (COURSE UNIT)

B2 [C] a ​unit that ​represents a ​successfullyfinishedpart of an ​educationalcourse: Each of these ​classes is ​worth three credits.

credit noun (LIST OF NAMES)

the credits [plural] a ​list of ​people who ​helped to make a ​film or a ​television or ​radioprogramme, that is ​shown or ​announced at the ​beginning or the end of it

creditverb

uk   us   /ˈkred.ɪt/

credit verb (PAY)

[T] to ​paymoney into a ​bankaccount: They credited my ​account with $20 after I ​pointed out the ​mistake.
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credit verb (BELIEVE)

[T not continuous] to ​believe something that ​seemsunlikely to be ​true: He ​eventried to ​pretend he was my ​son - can you credit it? It was hard to credit some of the ​stories we ​heard about her.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of credit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "credit" - Business English Dictionary

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creditnoun

uk   us   /ˈkredɪt/
[U] COMMERCE, FINANCE a ​method of ​paying for ​goods or ​services at a later ​time, usually ​payinginterest as well as the ​originalamount: give/extend/offer credit to sb U.S. ​banks are reluctant to ​extend credit to the ​troublednation.deny/refuse sb credit Have you ever been ​refused credit?on credit They've ​purchased all ​sorts of ​leisureequipment on credit. The ​card has no ​annualfee and ​users get up to eight weeks' interest-free credit.
[U] FINANCE the ​moneylent by ​financialorganizations to ​companies, ​governments, ​people, etc.: domestic/foreign/international credit The ​centralbank attributed the ​rise in ​domestic credit during the ​period to a ​rise in ​privatesector credit.cheap/affordable/easy credit Rising ​houseprices were fueled by ​easy credit. Agricultural borrowers are ​concerned about credit ​availability as the ​farmeconomyweakens.
[U] FINANCE the ​amount of ​risk when ​lendingmoney to a particular ​person or ​organization, ​based on how likely they are to ​pay it back: weak/poor/bad credit Too many ​mortgages had been ​granted to ​homebuyers with ​weak credit.good credit They will ​let you take the ​goods and ​pay later if your credit is good.
[C] BANKING a ​payment of ​money into a ​bankaccount: His ​bankstatementshows two credits of $5000 each.
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in credit UK BANKING if a ​person or their ​bankaccount is in credit, there is ​money in the ​account: As ​long as you ​stay in credit, there will be no ​charges for ​normaltransactions on your ​account.
[C] ( abbreviation CR) ACCOUNTING an ​amountrecorded on the ​rightside of a company's ​financialaccounts, which ​shows a ​decrease in ​assets or an ​increase in ​debt: The ​accountingsystemautomaticallygenerates a credit to the ​account that was ​debited.
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[C or S] TAX an ​amount by which someone is ​allowed to ​reduce the ​amount of ​tax they ​pay, because they have ​spentmoney on a particular thing: He ​introduced a new ​taxbreak in the ​form of a child-care credit.
See also
[C or U] ACCOUNTING, COMMERCE an ​amount of ​money that you have ​available to ​spend with a ​store or ​business, for ​example, because you ​returned a ​product or ​paid too much for it: If you are dissatisfied with any ​item, it may be ​returned within 14 days for credit, ​refund, or ​exchange.
[U] praise for doing something good: credit for sth The whole ​team deserves credit for ​bringing the ​project in on ​time.take (the) credit She ​felt he had taken the credit for her ​idea.

creditverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈkredɪt/
BANKING, FINANCE to show that ​money has been ​added to something such as an ​account: When ​dividends are received the shareholder's ​account will be credited.credit sth with €10/€1000, etc. Within a week my ​card was credited with the $219 difference.credit €10/€1000, etc. to sth The ​bank mistakenly credited almost $1 million to his ​account.
ACCOUNTING to ​record an ​amount on the ​rightside of a company's ​financialaccounts to show a ​decrease in ​assets or an ​increase in ​debt: credit sth to sth A ​fairamount should be periodically credited to '​reserve' for ​depreciation.
(Definition of credit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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