cross Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Definition of “cross” - English Dictionary

"cross" in British English

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uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/

cross verb (GO ACROSS)

A2 [I or T] to go ​across from one ​side of something to the other: It's not a good ​place to cross the ​road. Look both ​ways before you cross over (= cross the ​road). Cross the ​bridge and ​turnright. They crossed from Albania into Greece.cross sb's mind B2 If something crosses ​yourmind, you ​think of it: It crossed my ​mindyesterday that you must be ​short of ​staff. It never ​once crossed my ​mind that she might be ​unhappy.
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cross your arms/fingers/legs to put one of ​yourarms, ​fingers, or ​legs over the ​top of the other: She ​sat down and crossed her ​legs.

cross verb (ANNOY)

[T] to ​annoy someone by not doing or saying what they ​want: I wouldn't cross him if I were you, not if you ​valueyourlife.

cross verb (MIX)

[T] If you cross a ​plant or ​animal with another of a different ​type, you ​cause them to ​breed together in ​order to ​produce a new variety (= ​type of ​plant or ​animal).

cross verb (IN SPORT)

[I or T] in some ​sports, to ​hit, ​kick, or ​throw the ​ballacross the ​playingarea to another ​player, not ​forwards or ​backwards: He crossed (the ​ball) to Bremer, who ​somehowfailed to ​score from two ​metres out.

cross verb (MAKE SIGN)

UK specialized finance & economics to ​draw two ​linesacross the ​middle of a cheque to show that it ​needs to be ​paid into a ​bankaccount: a crossed ​chequecross yourself specialized When Catholics and some other ​types of Christians cross themselves, they ​movetheirhand down and then ​acrosstheirface or ​chest, making the ​shape of a cross.

crossnoun [C]

uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/

cross noun [C] (MARK)

A1 UK a written ​mark (x or +) ​formed by two ​lines going ​across each other. The ​mark x is usually used to show where something is, or that something has not been written ​correctly.
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cross noun [C] (OBJECT)

B1 an ​object made of one ​longuprightpiece of ​wood, with a ​smallerpieceacross it near the ​top. In the past, ​people were ​tied or ​fastened with ​nails to crosses as a ​punishment and ​lefthanging on them until they ​died. B1 an ​object in the ​shape of a cross that ​people were ​killed on, used as a ​symbol of ​Christianity: Christdied on the Cross. She ​wears a ​gold cross around her ​neck. The ​priest made the ​sign of the cross (= ​moved his or her ​hand down and then ​across the ​chest) over the ​deadbodies. a medal in the ​shape of a cross: In ​Britain, the Victoria Cross is ​awarded for ​acts of ​greatbravery during ​wartime.

cross noun [C] (MIXTURE)

a ​mixture of two different things that have been ​combined to ​produce something new: Police ​dogs are often a cross between a ​retriever and a ​German Shepherd.
See also

cross noun [C] (IN SPORT)

in some ​sports, a ​kick, ​hit, or ​throw of the ​ball that goes from one ​side of the ​playingarea to the other, not ​forwards or ​backwards: He ​headed the ​ball into the ​net, after a ​great cross from Pele.


uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/
mainly UK annoyed or ​angry: My Dad gets cross (with me) if I ​leave the ​kitchen in a ​mess.
adverb uk   /ˈkrɒ  us   /ˈkrɑː
"He's so ​unreliable!" she said crossly.


uk   /krɒs/  us   /krɑːs/
across: cross-border including different ​groups or ​subjects: cross-partydiscussions
(Definition of cross from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"cross" in Business English

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crossverb [T]

uk   us   /krɒs/
UK BANKING if you cross a cheque, you ​draw two ​lines across the middle of it to show that it must be ​paid into a ​bankaccount: a crossed ​cheque
(Definition of cross from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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