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Definition of “crush” - English Dictionary

"crush" in American English

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crushverb [T]

us   /krʌʃ/
  • crush verb [T] (PRESS)

to press something very hard so that it is broken or its shape is destroyed: The package got crushed in the mail. Her car was crushed by a falling tree.
  • crush verb [T] (SHOCK)

to upset or shock someone badly: I was crushed because I didn't complete the race.
  • crush verb [T] (DESTROY)

to defeat someone completely: They'll stop at nothing to crush the opposition.

crushnoun

us   /krʌʃ/
  • crush noun (ATTRACTION)

[C] infml a strong but temporary attraction for someone: She had a crush on Matthew in sixth grade.
  • crush noun (PRESS)

[U] a crowd of people: I can’t stand the crush of holiday shoppers at the mall.
(Definition of crush from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"crush" in British English

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crushverb

uk   /krʌʃ/ us   /krʌʃ/
  • crush verb (PRESS)

C2 [T] to press something very hard so that it is broken or its shape is destroyed: The package had been badly crushed in the post. Add three cloves of crushed garlic. His arm was badly crushed in the car accident.
[T] mainly UK to press paper or cloth so that it becomes full of folds and is no longer flat: My dress got all crushed in my suitcase.
[T] If people are crushed against other people or things, they are pressed against them: Tragedy struck when several people were crushed to death in the crowd.

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crushnoun

uk   /krʌʃ/ us   /krʌʃ/
(Definition of crush from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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