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Definition of “cure” - English Dictionary

"cure" in American English

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cureverb [T]

 us   /kjʊər/
  • cure verb [T] (MAKE WELL)

to make someone ​healthy again, or to ​cause an ​illness to go away: She was cured of her ​migraineheadaches when she ​changed her ​diet. fig. He ​worked to ​promoteprograms to cure America’s ​social and ​economic ills.
  • cure verb [T] (PRESERVE)

to ​treatplant or ​animalproducts by ​drying, ​smoking, ​salting, etc., to ​preserve it from ​decay: Sodium nitrite is used to cure ​meat.

curenoun [C]

 us   /kjʊər/
  • cure noun [C] (MAKING WELL)

the ​process of making a ​personhealthy again, esp. by giving ​treatment, or a ​treatment that ​causes a ​disease to go away: the ​effort to ​find a cure for ​cancer
(Definition of cure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"cure" in British English

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cureverb [T]

uk   /kjʊər/  us   /kjʊr/
  • cure verb [T] (MAKE WELL)

B2 to make someone with an ​illnesshealthy again: At one ​timedoctors couldn't cure TB/cure ​people of TB.
C1 to ​solve a ​problem: The ​president and his ​advisorsmeet this ​week to ​discuss how to cure ​inflation.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • cure verb [T] (PRESERVE)

to ​treatfood, ​tobacco, etc. with ​smoke, ​salt, etc. in ​order to ​preserve it: cured meats
Phrasal verbs

curenoun [C]

uk   /kjʊər/  us   /kjʊr/
B2 something that makes someone who is ​sickhealthy again: There's still no cure forcancer. The ​disease has no ​known cure (= a cure has not ​yet been ​found).
a ​solution to a ​problem: The ​best cure forboredom is hard ​work!
(Definition of cure from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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