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Definition of “cure” - English Dictionary

"cure" in American English

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cureverb [T]

us   /kjʊər/
  • cure verb [T] (MAKE WELL)

to make someone healthy again, or to cause an illness to go away: She was cured of her migraine headaches when she changed her diet. fig. He worked to promote programs to cure America’s social and economic ills.
  • cure verb [T] (PRESERVE)

to treat plant or animal products by drying, smoking, salting, etc., to preserve it from decay: Sodium nitrite is used to cure meat.

curenoun [C]

us   /kjʊər/
  • cure noun [C] (MAKING WELL)

the process of making a person healthy again, esp. by giving treatment, or a treatment that causes a disease to go away: the effort to find a cure for cancer
(Definition of cure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"cure" in British English

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cureverb [T]

uk   /kjʊər/ us   /kjʊr/
  • cure verb [T] (MAKE WELL)

B2 to make someone with an illness healthy again: At one time doctors couldn't cure TB/cure people of TB.
C1 to solve a problem: The president and his advisors meet this week to discuss how to cure inflation.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • cure verb [T] (PRESERVE)

to treat food, tobacco, etc. with smoke, salt, etc. in order to preserve it: cured meats
Phrasal verbs

curenoun [C]

uk   /kjʊər/ us   /kjʊr/
B2 something that makes someone who is sick healthy again: There's still no cure for cancer. The disease has no known cure (= a cure has not yet been found).
a solution to a problem: The best cure for boredom is hard work!
(Definition of cure from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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