dead Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “dead” - English Dictionary

Definition of "dead" - American English Dictionary

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deadadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ded/

dead adjective [not gradable] (NOT LIVING)

no ​longerliving: dead ​leaves Local ​residentsfound the ​whale dead on the ​beach. If a ​piece of ​machinery or ​equipment is dead, it is no ​longerworking: a dead ​battery The ​phonesuddenly went dead. infml If you ​describe a ​place as dead, you ​mean there is not much ​activity there that ​interests you: I ​love my ​hometown, but as a ​teenager I always ​found it dead.

dead adjective [not gradable] (COMPLETE)

complete or ​exact: The ​conductorwaited for dead ​silence before ​lifting his ​baton. He ​aimed for the dead ​center of the ​target.

deadadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ded/

dead adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY)

completely or ​extremely: After a hard day’s ​work, I was dead ​tired.

deadnoun

 us   /ded/

dead noun (DEAD PEOPLE)

[pl] people who are no ​longerliving: She did not ​know any of the ​nameslisted among the dead.

dead noun (DEEPEST PART)

[U] the ​deepest or most ​extremepart of something
(Definition of dead from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "dead" - British English Dictionary

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deadadjective

uk   us   /ded/

dead adjective (NOT LIVING)

A2 not now ​living: She's been dead for 20 ​years now. The ​motorcyclist was dead on ​arrival at the ​hospital. He was shot dead (= ​killed by ​shooting)outside his ​home.C2 mainly UK If a ​part of ​yourbody is dead, you cannot ​feel it: I've been ​sitting with my ​legscrossed for so ​long, my ​rightleg has gone dead.
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dead adjective (NOT IN USE)

UK If ​glasses and ​bottles that were ​previouslyfull are dead, they are now ​empty. In some ​sports, if a ​ball is dead, it is ​outside the ​area of ​play.

dead adjective (BORING)

C2 If a ​place is dead, it is too ​quiet and nothing ​interestinghappens there: The ​citycentre is ​quitelively during the ​day, but it's ​totally dead at ​night.

dead adjective (EQUIPMENT)

B2 If a ​piece of ​equipment is dead, it is not ​working: a dead ​battery The ​phonesuddenly went dead.

deadadjective [before noun], adverb

uk   us   /ded/
C1 complete(ly): The ​conductorwaited for dead silence before ​commencing the ​performance. The ​postoffice is dead (= ​straight) ahead. Aim for the dead (= ​exact)centre of the ​target. I always ​try to ​arrive dead (= ​exactly) on ​time. UK informal very: The ​exam was dead easy. I'm dead ​hungry. "How was the ​film?" "It was dead good."dead set against (doing) sth (UK also dead against (doing) sth) to be ​completelyopposed to something: He's dead set againstliving in the ​city. You won't be ​able to ​change his ​mind - he's dead against the ​plan.dead set on (doing) sth to be very ​determined to do or have something: Martha's dead set on having a new ​bike.

deadnoun

uk   us   /ded/
the dead [plural] dead ​people: Three ​children were among the dead. A ​ceasefire has been called to ​allow the ​survivors to ​burytheir dead.
(Definition of dead from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "dead" - Business English Dictionary

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deadadjective

uk   us   /ded/
no ​longer existing, or no ​longer having ​success or making ​progress: Some believe that ​employeeloyalty to ​organizations is dead because lifetime ​employment is no ​longer possible. The ​onlineserviceattracted far fewer ​customers than ​predicted and is practically dead, ​analysts said. She ​saved a nearly dead $250 million ​deal to ​renovate the ​downtownarea.
if a ​place is dead, nothing is ​happening there: Taxi ​driversreported that ​business was ​slow and the ​airport has been dead.
used to describe a ​machine or ​equipment that has ​stoppedworking: go dead The ​phoneline went dead.
dead in the water having ​failed and very unlikely to have any ​success in the future: Mr Winters said his ​plans for a ​managementbuyout were dead in the water.
(Definition of dead from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“dead” in Business English

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