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Definition of “delay” - English Dictionary

"delay" in American English

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delayverb [I/T]

us   /dɪˈleɪ/
to cause to be late or to cause to happen at a later time, or to wait before acting: [T] He wants to delay the meeting until Wednesday. [T] The space launch was delayed because of bad weather. [I] Don’t delay in ordering tickets to the show.

delaynoun [C/U]

us   /dɪˈleɪ/
a period when something that might happen does not happen or does not happen quickly enough, or the failure to act quickly: [U] You need to call back without delay. [C] The holiday traffic is likely to cause long delays. [C] Any further delay would threaten the entire project.
(Definition of delay from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"delay" in British English

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delayverb

uk   /dɪˈleɪ/ us   /dɪˈleɪ/
A2 [I or T] to make something happen at a later time than originally planned or expected: My plane was delayed by an hour. Heavy snow delayed the start of the game. [+ -ing verb] I think we should delay deciding about this until next year.
B1 [T] to cause someone or something to be slow or late: I was delayed by traffic.
[I] to not act quickly or immediately: If you delay now, the opportunity might be lost.

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delaynoun [C or U]

uk   /dɪˈleɪ/ us   /dɪˈleɪ/
A2 the situation in which you have to wait longer than expected for something to happen, or the time that you have to wait: This situation needs to be tackled without delay. Long delays are predicted on the motorway because of the accident. There has been a delay in the book's publication.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of delay from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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