depression Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “depression” - English Dictionary

"depression" in American English

See all translations

depressionnoun

 us   /dɪˈpreʃ·ən/
  • depression noun (CAUSE UNHAPPINESS)

[U] a feeling of sadness, or medical a type of mental illness that causes long periods of unhappiness: I’m just beginning to get over the depression from losing my job. medical Tiredness, loss of appetite, and sleeping problems are symptoms of depression.
  • depression noun (PRESS DOWN)

[C] a part in a surface that is slightly lower than the rest: There was a depression in the sand where he’d been lying.
  • depression noun (REDUCE)

world history [C] a period in which there is very little business activity and little employment: My parents lived through the Great Depression of the 1930s.
(Definition of depression from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"depression" in British English

See all translations

depressionnoun

uk   /dɪˈpreʃ.ən/  us   /dɪˈpreʃ.ən/
  • depression noun (UNHAPPINESS)

B2 [U] the state of feeling very unhappy and without hope for the future: I was overwhelmed by feelings of depression.
B2 [C or U] a mental illness in which a person is very unhappy and anxious (= worried and nervous) for long periods and cannot have a normal life during these periods: Tiredness, loss of appetite, and sleeping problems are all classic symptoms of depression. If you suffer from depression, it's best to get professional help.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of depression from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"depression" in Business English

See all translations

depressionnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /dɪˈpreʃən/ ECONOMICS
a recession (= time of low economic activity, when investments lose value, businesses fail and people lose their jobs) that lasts for a long period of time, usually several years: plunge/slide into depression The Thirties saw the world plunge into depression. The Wall Street Crash of 1929 brought severe economic depression and hardship to Canada. This was a period of deep depression. For most of the 20th century, economists focused on understanding and controlling inflation and depressions. New mines are being developed and old mines reopened, lifting communities across Northern Nevada out of the depression left by the industry's last crash.
the Depression (also the Great Depression)
the period in the years after 1929 until the middle of the 1930s, or, in some cases, the 1940s, when there was a very low level of economic activity in the US, Europe, and many other countries. Many people lost their jobs and were very poor: The Federal Home Loan Bank system was created in the 1930s by the federal government to stimulate lending during the Depression.
(Definition of depression from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of depression?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“depression” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Read More 

Word of the Day

droid

a robot (= a machine controlled by computer) that is made to look like a human

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More