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Definition of “direct” - English Dictionary

"direct" in American English

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directadjective

us   /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/
  • direct adjective (STRAIGHT)

going in a straight line toward somewhere or someone without stopping or changing direction and without anything coming in between: Is there a direct flight to Madison, or do we have to change planes in Chicago? This plant should be kept out of direct sunlight.
Direct also means without anyone or anything else being involved: She fired the principal and took direct control of the school.
Direct also means very honest in saying what you mean: Her manner was businesslike and direct.

directverb

us   /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/
  • direct verb (AIM)

[T always + adv/prep] to aim something in a particular direction or at particular people: His criticism was directed at everybody who disagreed with him.
[T always + adv/prep] To direct is also to show someone the particular way to get somewhere: Can you direct me to the nearest bus stop?
  • direct verb (CONTROL)

[I/T] to control or be in charge of an activity, organization, etc.: [T] General Eisenhower directed the allied forces in World War II.
[I/T] When someone directs a movie, play, etc., that person tells the actors how to play their parts.
  • direct verb (ORDER)

[T] fml to give an order or instruction to someone: The judge directed the defendant to be quiet.

directadverb

us   /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/
  • direct adverb (WITHOUT INVOLVING OTHERS)

without anything or anyone else being involved: Can I dial this number direct or do I have to go through the operator?
(Definition of direct from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"direct" in British English

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directadjective

uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/ us   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/
  • direct adjective (STRAIGHT)

B1 going in a straight line towards somewhere or someone without stopping or changing direction: a direct route/line Is there a direct train to Edinburgh?
B2 without anyone or anything else being involved or between: She decided to take direct control of the project. He denied that he had any direct involvement in the deal. Do you have any direct experience of this kind of work? He left as a direct result/consequence of what she said. There is a direct link/connection between smoking and lung cancer.
direct light/heat
strong light or heat that has nothing protecting and separating you from it: This plant should be kept out of direct sunlight.
direct relation/relative/descendant
a relation who is related to you through one of your parents, not through an aunt or uncle, etc.: Diana is a direct descendant of Robert Peel.

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  • direct adjective (HONEST)

C1 Someone who is direct says what they think in a very honest way without worrying about other people's opinions: I like her open and direct manner.
directness
noun [U] uk   /daɪˈrekt.nəs/ /dɪˈrekt.nəs/ us   /daɪˈrekt.nəs/ /dɪˈrekt.nəs/

directadverb

uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/ us   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/
  • direct adverb (STRAIGHT)

B1 in a straight line towards somewhere without stopping or changing direction: Does this bus go direct to the airport?
B1 without anyone or anything else being involved or between: I intended to go direct to the manager with my complaint.

directverb

uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/ us   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/
  • direct verb (CONTROL)

C1 [T] to control or be in charge of an activity, organization, etc.: She directs a large charity.
C1 [T] to tell people the direction in which they must drive: There was a police officer directing the traffic.
B1 [I or T] to be in charge of a film or play and tell the actors how to play their parts: He wanted to give up acting and start directing (his own films). "Jaws" was directed by Steven Spielberg.
Compare

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  • direct verb (AIM)

C1 [T usually + adv/prep] to aim something in a particular direction: Was that remark directedat/towards me? Criticism was directed against/at the manufacturers of the product.

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  • direct verb (ORDER)

[T + obj + to infinitive ] formal to order someone, especially officially: The judge directed the defendant to remain silent.

directadverb

uk   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/ us   /daɪˈrekt/ /dɪˈrekt/
without having to stop or change direction: Does this train go direct to Edinburgh?
without anything or anyone else being involved or in between: Can I dial this number direct or do I have to go through the switchboard?
(Definition of direct from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"direct" in Business English

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directadjective

uk   /dɪˈrekt, daɪˈrekt/ us  
without anyone or anything else being involved or coming between two people or things: She decided to take direct control of the project. He had had no direct involvement with the deal. Have you any direct experience of this kind of work? The managers talked about the need for more direct communication between employees. We do not and cannot accept any direct compensation or gifts.
happening as an immediate effect of something: Delays in project schedules are often the direct result of cutting costs. We hope that the increase in the marketing budget will have a direct impact on sales.
TRANSPORT going to a place without any stops or changes in direction: a direct flight/route

directverb [T]

uk   /dɪˈrekt, daɪˈrekt/ us  
to control or be in charge of an activity, organization, etc.: She directs a large charity. They've appointed someone from outside the organization to direct the fiscal review.
to aim something in a particular direction, or at a particular person or group of people: direct sth toward(s) sb This sales promotion is directed toward retail customers.direct sth to sth/sb Please direct concerns and queries to the project administrator. Any future donations will be directed to the housing fund. We need to direct the board's attention to this matter immediately.

directadverb

uk   /dɪˈrekt, daɪˈrekt/ us  
without anything or anyone else being involved, or coming between two people or things: Can I dial this number direct or do I have to go through the switchboard?
TRANSPORT without making a stop or a change in direction: I'm not sure if you can fly direct to Buenos Aires from here.
(Definition of direct from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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