dispute Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “dispute” - English Dictionary

Definition of "dispute" - American English Dictionary

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disputenoun [C/U]

 us   /dɪˈspjut/
an ​argument or ​disagreement: [C] Management and the ​union are ​trying to ​resolve the dispute over ​workingconditions. Her ​skill is not in dispute (= there is no ​disagreement about her ​skill), but she doesn’t ​produce enough ​work.
dispute
verb [I/T]  us   /dɪˈspjut/
[+ that clause] I don’t dispute that his ​films are ​entertaining, but they don’t have much ​depth.
(Definition of dispute from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "dispute" - British English Dictionary

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disputenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /dɪˈspjuːt/ /ˈdɪs.pjuːt/
C2 an ​argument or ​disagreement, ​especially an ​official one between, for ​example, ​workers and ​employers or two ​countries with a ​commonborder: a ​bitter/​long-running dispute a ​border dispute a ​pay/​legal/​trade dispute They have been ​unable to ​settle/​resolve the dispute overworkingconditions. The ​unions are in dispute withmanagement over ​pay.beyond (all) dispute C2 certainly: He is beyond all dispute the ​finestactor in ​Hollywood today.in dispute being ​doubted: I don't ​think her ​ability is in dispute - what I ​question is her ​attitude.open to dispute not ​certain: He says it's the ​bestmusicalequipment you can ​buy, but I ​think that's ​open to dispute.
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disputeverb [I or T]

uk   us   /dɪˈspjuːt/
C2 to ​disagree with something that someone says: Few would dispute his ​status as the ​finestartist of the ​period. The ​circumstances of her ​death have been hotly disputed. [+ (that)] I don't dispute (that) his ​movies are ​entertaining, but they don't have much ​depth.
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disputation
noun [C or U] uk   /ˌdɪs.pjʊˈteɪ.ʃən/  us   /-pjuː-/ formal
a ​disagreement
disputatious
adjective uk   /ˌdɪs.pjʊˈteɪ.ʃəs/  us   /-pjuː-/ old use
He's a disputatious ​young man (= he ​argues a lot).
disputed
adjective uk   /dɪˈspjuː.tɪd/  us   /-t̬ɪd/
a disputed ​border/​goal disputed ​territory
(Definition of dispute from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "dispute" - Business English Dictionary

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disputenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈdɪspjuːt/
an argument or disagreement, especially an ​official one: The ​judge urged the feuding ​partners to ​settle their legal dispute . Staff have been in a long-running pay dispute with the ​company. An ​official involved in the dispute said that the ​attorney has ​indicated he is likely to ​agree to the ​revisedterms. He was in dispute with his last ​company, which had ​terminated his ​contract. Workers at the ​carplant are to ​stage a fresh ​strike in a dispute overpay.dispute between/with sb/sth (and sb/sth) The dispute between Brazil and the United ​States over ​immigrationchecks continued. a bitter/long-running dispute
in dispute not yet ​agreed on or ​accepted by everyone: Sensitive ​documentsrelated to ​personnel that ought to be ​protected for ​privacy reasons are the only ​documents that are in dispute. The facts in this matter are in dispute.

disputeverb [T]

uk   us   /dɪˈspjuːt/
to ​disagree with or ​express doubts about something: Health ​insurers dispute the ​doctors' ​statement that they don't ​pay enough to make up for the ​cost of the vaccine. Many in the ​televisionindustry dispute ​researchfindings suggesting ​negativelong-termeffects of ​television violence.
(Definition of dispute from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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