Definition of “divorce” - English Dictionary

“divorce” in British English

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divorcenoun

uk /dɪˈvɔːs/ us /dɪˈvɔːrs/

divorce noun (PEOPLE)

B1 [ C or U ] an official or legal process to end a marriage:

The last I heard they were getting a divorce.
Divorce is on the increase.
Ellie wants a divorce.
What are the chances of a marriage ending in divorce?

More examples

  • I'm sure my views on marriage are coloured by my parents' divorce.
  • She came out of the divorce settlement a rich woman.
  • Her mind flashed back to the day of their divorce.
  • One common cause of homelessness is separation or divorce.
  • In spite of the divorce there was no awkwardness between them - in fact they seemed very much at ease.

divorceverb

uk /dɪˈvɔːs/ us /dɪˈvɔːrs/

divorce verb (PEOPLE)

B2 [ I or T ] to end your marriage by an official or legal process:

She's divorcing her husband.

More examples

  • She divorced her husband on the grounds of mental cruelty.
  • My brother's getting divorced so I'm going home for a family powwow this weekend.
  • Have you heard the news about Tina and Tom? They're getting divorced.
  • There is no longer any stigma to being divorced.
  • My parents separated when I was six and divorced a couple of years later.

divorcénoun [ C ]

/dɪˌvɔːˈseɪː/ us /dəˌvɔːrˈseɪː/

(Definition of “divorce” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“divorce” in American English

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divorceverb [ I/T ]

us /dɪˈvɔrs, -ˈvoʊrs/

to cause a marriage to a husband or wife to end by an official or legal process, or to have a marriage ended in this way:

[ T ] Ford divorced his wife, Anne, in 1964, and married Cristina a year later.
[ T ] They didn’t get divorced (= end their marriage legally) until 2007.
divorce
noun [ C/U ] us /dɪˈvɔrs, -ˈvoʊrs/

[ C ] Both of them agreed to the divorce.

divorcénoun [ C ]

/dɪˌvɔrˈseɪ, -ˌvoʊr-, -ˈsi/

a man whose marriage officially ended while his wife was still alive

(Definition of “divorce” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)