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Definition of “dog” - English Dictionary

"dog" in American English

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dognoun [C]

us   /dɔɡ/
  • dog noun [C] (ANIMAL)

an animal with four legs, commonly kept as a pet, and sometimes used to guard things
  • dog noun [C] (PERSON)

slang a person of a stated type: You won $1000? You lucky dog!

dogverb [T]

us   /dɔɡ/ -gg-
  • dog verb [T] (FOLLOW)

to follow someone closely and continually: The scandal seems likely to dog him for months to come.
(Definition of dog from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"dog" in British English

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dognoun [C]

uk   /dɒɡ/ us   /dɑːɡ/
  • dog noun [C] (ANIMAL)

A1 a common animal with four legs, especially kept by people as a pet or to hunt or guard things: my pet dog wild dogs dog food We could hear dogs barking in the distance.

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dogverb [T]

uk   /dɒɡ/ us   /dɑːɡ/ -gg-
(Definition of dog from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"dog" in Business English

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dognoun [C]

uk   /dɒɡ/ us  
informal an investment, company, or product that will probably fail
MARKETING a product that has a small share of a market that has a low rate of growth
dog eat dog informal
a situation in which competitors are willing to harm each other in order to be successful: It is dog eat dog on Las Vegas's world-famous Strip as huge casino complexes compete for attention. The fast-growing telecom industry was a dog-eat-dog world where firms were either looking to expand or ripe for takeover.
eat your own dog food informal
if a company eats its own dog food, it uses the products that it makes in its own business activities, rather than using products made by other companies: The company, which makes high-tech equipment, could not have grown as fast as it has without eating lots of its own dog food.
go to the dogs informal also US go to hell in a handbasket/handcart
to get into a very bad situation: The economy seems to be going to the dogs. Signs of a global recession inevitably conjure up thoughts of the last time we went to hell in a handbasket: the Great Depression of the 1930s.
that dog won't hunt US informal
used to say that a plan will fail
See also
(Definition of dog from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “dog”
in Korean 개…
in Arabic كَلْب…
in Malaysian anjing…
in French chien…
in Russian собака…
in Chinese (Traditional) 動物, (尤指當作寵物或用來打獵、看護東西的)狗,犬…
in Italian cane…
in Turkish köpek…
in Polish pies…
in Spanish perro…
in Vietnamese con chó…
in Portuguese cachorro…
in Thai สุนัข…
in German der Hund…
in Catalan gos…
in Japanese イヌ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 动物, (尤指当作宠物或用来打猎、看护东西的)狗,犬…
in Indonesian anjing…
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“dog” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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