drive Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “drive” - English Dictionary

Definition of "drive" - American English Dictionary

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driveverb

 us   /drɑɪv/ (past tense drove  /droʊv/ , past participle driven  /ˈdrɪv·ən/ )

drive verb (USE VEHICLE)

[I/T] to ​travel in a ​motorvehicle, esp. as the ​person who ​operates it: [T] We drove 40 ​miles to ​visit my ​aunt. [I] She drove through Pennsylvania to Ohio. [I] She never ​learned how to drive (= ​operate a ​car). [T] I’ll drive you to the ​station (= take you there in my ​car).

drive verb (FORCE)

[T] to ​force someone or something to go ​somewhere or do something: He drove a ​nail into the ​wall. He was driven (= His ​actions were caused) by ​greed.

drive verb (PROVIDE POWER)

[T] to ​provide the ​power to make a ​machineoperate: The ​waterpump is driven by a ​windmill.
Phrasal verbs

drivenoun

 us   /drɑɪv/

drive noun (TRIP)

[C] a ​trip in a ​motorvehicle: We have a 200-mile drive ​ahead of us. [C] A drive is also a ​road for ​cars and is sometimes used as ​part of a ​name: Riverside Drive

drive noun (PLANNED EFFORT)

[C] a ​planned, usually long-lasting, ​effort to ​achieve something: The ​universitysponsored a ​blood drive (= ​effort to ​collectblood) for the ​RedCross.

drive noun (FORCE)

[C/U] strongdetermination to do or ​achieve something: [U] Intelligence isn’t enough – you’ve got to have the drive to ​succeed.
(Definition of drive from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "drive" - British English Dictionary

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driveverb

uk   us   /draɪv/ (drove, driven)

drive verb (USE VEHICLE)

A1 [I or T] to ​move or ​travel on ​land in a ​motorvehicle, ​especially as the ​personcontrolling the vehicle's ​movement: I'm ​learning to drive. "Are you going by ​train?" "No, I'm driving." She drives a ​redsportscar. They're driving to Chicago on ​Tuesday. We ​sawtheircaroutside the ​house and drove on/past/away. I drove my ​daughter to ​school.
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driving while intoxicated (abbreviation DWI) US specialized the ​crime of ​operating a ​motorvehicle after having ​drunk more ​alcohol than you are ​legallyallowed to: Smith was ​arrested and ​charged with DWI.
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drive verb (FORCE)

C1 [T] to ​force someone or something to go ​somewhere or do something: They used ​dogs to drive the ​sheep into a ​pen. A ​post had been driven (= ​hit hard) into the ​ground near the ​tree. By the end of the ​year, most of the ​occupyingtroops had been driven from the ​city. [+ to infinitive] In the end, it was his ​violentbehaviour that drove her toleavehome.C1 [T] to ​force someone or something into a ​particularstate, often an ​unpleasant one: In the ​course of ​history, ​love has driven men and women tostrangeextremes. Recent ​events have driven the ​stockmarket to ​lows not ​seen in ten ​years.drive sb mad, crazy, etc. B2 informal to make someone ​extremelyannoyed: My ​mother-in-law has been ​staying with us this past ​week and she's driving me ​crazy. He ​leavesdirtyclothes all over the ​floor and it's driving me ​mad.drive sb wild informal to make you very ​excited, ​especiallysexually: When he ​runs his ​fingers through my ​hair, it drives me ​wild!
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drive verb (PROVIDE POWER)

C2 [T] to ​provide the ​power to ​keep a ​machineworking, or to make something ​happen: The ​engine drives the ​wheels. Water drives the ​turbines that ​produceelectricity. [T] If you drive a ​ball, ​especially in golf or baseball, you ​hit it hard so that it ​travels a ​long way: Slater drove the ​ball down the ​fairway.
Phrasal verbs

drivenoun

uk   us   /draɪv/

drive noun (ROAD)

[C] used in the ​names of some ​roads, ​especiallyroadscontaininghouses: 12 Maple Drive [C] mainly UK (also driveway) a ​shortprivateroad that ​leads from a ​publicroad to a ​house or ​garage: I ​parked in the drive.

drive noun (PLANNED EFFORT)

[C] a ​plannedeffort to ​achieve something: The ​latestpromotionalmaterial is all ​part of a recruitment drive.UK I'm ​meant to be on an economy drive at the ​moment, so I'm ​trying not to ​spend too much.

drive noun (COMPUTING)

B1 [C] a ​device for ​storingcomputerinformation: a hard drive a ​DVD drive a CD drive

drive noun (VEHICLE)

B1 [C] a ​journey by ​car: It's a ​long drive from Auckland to Wellington. Shall we go for a drive this ​afternoon? [U] the ​system used to ​power a ​vehicle: a ​car with left-hand/​right-hand drive (= in which the ​driversits in the ​seat on the ​left/​right). a four-wheel drive ​vehicle

drive noun (POWER)

C1 [U] energy and ​determination to ​achieve things: We are ​looking for someone with drive and ​ambition. [+ to infinitive] He has the drive tosucceed. Later on in ​life the sex drive ​tends to ​diminish. [C] (in ​sport, ​especially golf or baseball) a ​powerfulhit that ​sends a ​ball a ​long way
(Definition of drive from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "drive" - Business English Dictionary

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driveverb [T]

uk   us   /draɪv/ (drove, driven)
to cause or ​influence something: be driven by sth The country ​needs to ​shift from export-led ​growth to ​growth driven by ​domesticdemand. This ​company is driven by ​customers and by the ​markets in which we do our ​business.
to cause something to ​progress, ​develop, or ​growstronger: The ​firm said it would drive ​sales by ​switching into larger ​premises while ​closingsmallerstores. The ​company yesterday ​reportedrecordiron ore ​production for the ​year to June, driven by a ​construction and ​manufacturingboom in China.
to ​force something to ​happen or someone to do something: drive sb/sth into/out of/to sth Analysts say these ​policies will drive the ​economy into ​recession. The ​prospect of a ​consumerboom helped drive the ​stockmarket to new ​peaks yesterday.
be in the driving seat (also be in the driver's seat) UK to be in ​control of a ​situation: With ​employers fighting among themselves for ​staff, IT ​workers are in the driving ​seat. He believes there will be ​consolidation in the ​airlineindustry and ​wants his ​company to be in the driver's ​seat of any ​merger.
drive a hard bargain to expect a lot in ​exchange for what you ​pay or ​agree to: The ​unions are driving a hard ​bargain on ​pay.

drivenoun

uk   us   /draɪv/
[C] an ​effort to ​achieve something: drive for sth The ​supermarket continues in its relentless drive for ​expansion. drive to do sth They are ​expanding their ​telephonebankingservice for ​smallbusinesses in a ​keypart of their drive to ​cutcosts and ​boostefficiency. a recruitment/​marketing/​cost-cutting drive
[C] IT a ​piece of ​equipment for reading and ​storingcomputerinformation: a CD-ROM/​DVD drive
[U] energy and ​determination to ​achieve things: We're looking for someone with drive and ​ambition to ​fill this important ​post.drive to do sth She has the drive to ​succeed.
(Definition of drive from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“drive” in Business English

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