duty Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “duty” - English Dictionary

Definition of "duty" - British English Dictionary

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dutynoun [C or U]

uk   /ˈdjuː.ti/  us   /ˈduː.t̬i/

duty noun [C or U] (RESPONSIBILITY)

B1 something that you have to do because it is ​part of ​yourjob, or something that you ​feel is the ​right thing to do: The duty of the ​agency is to ​act in the ​bestinterests of the ​child. [+ to infinitive] I ​felt it was my duty totell them the ​truth. You have a duty to yourself to take a ​breakonce in a while. He only went to ​see her out of duty (= because he ​thought he should). You should report for duty (= ​arrive at ​work) at 8 a.m. on ​Monday. What ​time are you off/on duty (= when do you ​finish/​startwork)tomorrow?be duty bound to do sth to have to do something because it is ​your duty: We are duty ​bound to ​justify how we ​spendourfunds.
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duty noun [C or U] (TAX)

a ​taxpaid to the ​government, ​especially on things that you ​bring into a ​country: There's a high duty onalcohol.
(Definition of duty from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "duty" - Business English Dictionary

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dutynoun

uk   /ˈdjuːti/  us   /ˈduːti/ (plural duties)
[C or U] LAW a ​responsibility to do something because it is ​legally or morally ​right to do it: Every ​lawyer has a ​strong sense of duty and ​responsibility.a duty to do sth They have a duty to ensure ​customers receive ​soundadvice.be sb's duty It is your duty to announce any ​conflict of ​interest.do your duty I ​felt that I had done my duty in ​reporting the incident to the ​police. It was ​alleged that the ​company had failed in its duty to ​advisecustomers of the ​technical aspects of the paint ​system.
[C, usually plural] HR something that you have to do because it is ​part of your ​job: His duties ​included photographing ​engineeringprojects such as bridges and airfields.perform/undertake/do duties People ​employed under similar ​conditions should not be ​paid less than others ​performing similar duties. teaching/cleaning/​administrative duties
[U] HR one of the ​periods of ​time that a ​working day is ​divided into during which someone ​works: night/day duty Daniels ​volunteered for night duty so he could take ​classes at the University of Arizona.
[C or U] TAX, COMMERCE a ​taxpaid on ​goods that are ​bought or ​imported: duty on sth He said that duty on a bottle of wine in France is ​equivalent to 2p compared with £1.16 here.impose/raise/increase duty The duty on ​housepurchases of £250,000 or more was ​increased to 2.5%. acut/​rise/​increase in duty fuel/tobacco/​petrol duty
off duty not ​working, and not ​responsible for ​dealing with things that ​happen at ​work: He ​summoned his entire ​unit to a ​crisismeeting, ​even though many were off duty. When your Estate Manager goes off duty, the alarm ​system will be ​monitored by a ​remoteservice.
on duty working, and ​responsible for ​dealing with things that ​happen at ​work: During ​officehours there is always a ​planningofficer on duty who ​deals with ​enquiries. The night ​shift goes on duty at 10 pm.

dutyadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈdjuːti/  us   /ˈduːti/
HR used to describe the ​person who is on duty at a particular ​time: duty ​engineer/​manager/​solicitor
(Definition of duty from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“duty” in Business English

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