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Definition of “effect” - English Dictionary

"effect" in American English

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effectnoun

 us   /ɪˈfekt/
  • effect noun (RESULT)

[C/U] the ​result of a ​particularinfluence; something that ​happens because of something ​else: [C] The ​medicine had the effect of making me ​sleepy. [C] Cold ​waterslowshurricanegrowth, but ​warmwater has the ​opposite effect. [U] The new ​managementactually has not had much effect on us.
  • effect noun (USE)

[U] (esp. of ​rules or ​laws) ​official or ​legal use: Winter ​parkingrules are in effect (= must be ​obeyed) . All ​salaryincreases will take effect (= ​begin) in ​January.

effectverb [T]

 us   /ɪˈfekt/
  • effect verb [T] (ACHIEVE)

to ​achieve something and ​cause it to ​happen: It will take ​years to effect ​meaningfulchanges in the ​educationalsystem.
(Definition of effect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"effect" in British English

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effectnoun

uk   /ɪˈfekt/  us   /əˈfekt/
  • effect noun (RESULT)

B1 [C or U] the ​result of a ​particularinfluence: The ​radiationleak has had a ​disastrous effect on/upon the ​environment. I ​tried taking ​tablets for the ​headache but they didn't have any effect. I ​think I'm ​suffering from the effects of too little ​sleep. She has a lot of ​confidence, which she uses to good effect (= to her ​advantage) in ​interviews.
See also
take effect
C1 to ​produce or ​achieve the ​results you ​want: They had to ​wait ten ​minutes for the ​anaesthetic to take effect before they ​stitched up the ​cut.
for effect
If you say or do something for effect, you ​intentionally do it to ​shockpeople or ​attracttheirattention: I get the ​impression that she uses ​badlanguage in ​meetings for effect.
in effect
C2 in ​fact, or in ​practice: So in effect the ​government have ​loweredtaxes for the ​rich and ​raised them for the ​poor.
to that effect (also to the effect that)
used to ​express that what you are ​reporting is only a ​short and ​generalform of what was really said: She said she was ​unhappy, or words to that effect. He said something to the effect that he would have to ​changejobs if the ​situationcontinued.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • effect noun (USE)

C2 [U] use: The ​presentsystem of ​payment will ​remain in effect (= be used) until the end of the ​rentalagreement. When do the new ​drivinglaws come into effect? The new ​salaryincreases will take effect (= ​begin) from ​Januaryonwards.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • effect noun (THEATRE, ETC.)

effects [plural] (also special effects)
B1 lighting, ​sounds, and ​objects that are ​speciallyproduced for the ​stage or a ​film and are ​intended to make something that does not ​existseemreal: This is a ​movieworthseeing for ​its effects ​alone.

effectverb [T]

uk   /ɪˈfekt/  us   /əˈfekt/ formal
(Definition of effect from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"effect" in Business English

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effectnoun [C]

uk   us   /ɪˈfekt/
the ​result of a particular ​influence: have/produce an effect Anti-inflationary ​measures do not yet seem to be having any effect. effect of sth (on sth) The effect of the ​redundancies on ​morale has been extremely ​damaging.see/feel/suffer the effects of sth Businesses are already ​feeling the effects of the new ​charges.an adverse/negative/detrimental effect The ​slowdown will have a detrimental effect on ​earnings in the ​shortterm. a significant/profound/dramatic effect reduce/minimize the effects The problem is, how to ​deal with the ​demand for more and better ​goods while ​minimizing the effect on the ​environment. They ​questioned whether ​financialliberalization had had the desired effect (= had done what it was intended to do).
be in effect
to be ​active or being used: At that ​time a ​totalban on ​financialtransactions was in effect.
come into effect (also take effect)
to ​startworking or being used: On April 1 new ​salestaxes will come into effect. The new ​creditregulations will take effect next ​year.
in effect
in fact, or in ​practice: The ​rulingmeant that, in effect, the ​company was ​allowed to continue to do ​business as usual.
put/bring sth into effect
to ​start using something or making it ​work: The ​aim is to ​develop new ​managementstrategies and put them into effect.
with immediate effect/with effect from
used to describe a ​change that ​happens immediately or from a particular ​date: She was ​appointedchiefexecutive with immediate effect. The ​company has announced the ​appointment of 13 new ​partners, with effect from 1 July 2012.
effects
[plural] LAW a person's possessions: After his death, an ​inventory was taken of his effects. Company ​relocationpolicies may ​cover the ​cost of ​insuring personal effects in ​transit.

effectverb [T]

uk   us   /ɪˈfekt/
to cause something to ​happen: The ​transfer of a ​business is ​governed or effected by the ​law of the country in which the ​business is ​situated.
(Definition of effect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“effect” in Business English

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