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Definition of “elect” - English Dictionary

"elect" in American English

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electverb

 us   /ɪˈlekt/
to ​decide on or ​choose, esp. to ​choose a ​person for a ​particularjob by ​voting: [T] We elect ​representatives every two ​years. [T] She was elected to the ​board of ​directors. [+ to infinitive] He was ​invited to ​join them at the ​concert, but he elected to ​stayhome and ​watch the ​ballgame.

electadjective [only after n, not gradable]

 us   /ɪˈlekt/
(of a ​person) who has ​won a ​vote but not ​yet taken ​office: the president-elect
(Definition of elect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"elect" in British English

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electverb [T]

uk   /iˈlekt/  us   /iˈlekt/
B2 to ​decide on or ​choose, ​especially to ​choose a ​person for a ​particularjob, by ​voting: The President is elected for a four-year ​term of ​office. [+ as + noun] We elected him asourrepresentative. [+ noun] She was elected Chair of the Board of Governors. [+ to infinitive] The ​group elected one of ​theirmembers to be ​theirspokesperson.
elect to do sth formal
to ​choose to do a ​particular thing: She elected to take early ​retirementinstead of ​moving to the new ​location.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

electable
adjective uk   /iˈlek.tə.bəl/  us   /iˈlek.tə.bəl/
Clinton's ​youthfulimage made him an ​extremely electable ​candidate.

electnoun [plural]

uk   /iˈlekt/  us   /iˈlekt/

electadj [after noun]

/iˈlekt/  us /iˈlekt/
(Definition of elect from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"-elect" in Business English

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-electsuffix

used after the ​title of an ​officialjob to refer to someone who has been chosen by ​vote to do that ​job, but who has not yet ​started doing it: Mr Theroux is chairman-elect of the Promotion Marketing Association.

electverb [T]

uk   us   /ɪˈlekt/
to choose a ​person to do a particular ​job by ​voting: elect sb as sth He was elected unanimously as Chairman.elect sb to sth In 2006, she was elected to the ​board of ​directors before taking over as ​president in 2009.elect sb sth He was elected ​executivevicepresident and ​chieffinancialofficer. a democratically/newly/recently electedofficial
elect to do sth
formal to choose to do a particular thing: The ​buildingsociety elected to become a ​stockmarketcompany in 2008.
(Definition of -elect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “elect”
in Korean 선출하다…
in Arabic يَنْتَخِب…
in Malaysian dipilih, pilih…
in French élire, choisir de faire qqch.…
in Russian избирать, выбирать…
in Chinese (Traditional) 選舉,推選…
in Italian eleggere…
in Turkish oylamayla seçmek…
in Polish wybierać…
in Spanish elegir, decidir…
in Vietnamese bầu cử, chọn…
in Portuguese eleger, escolher…
in Thai เลือกตั้ง, เลือก…
in German wählen…
in Catalan elegir…
in Japanese (人)を選ぶ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 选举,推选…
in Indonesian memilih, lebih suka…
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“elect” in Business English

More meanings of “elected”

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