endorse Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “endorse” - English Dictionary

Definition of "endorse" - American English Dictionary

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endorseverb [T]

 us   /ɪnˈdɔrs/

endorse verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to make a ​publicstatement of ​yourapproval or ​support for something or someone: We’re not endorsing ​taxincreases. My ​wife has ​publicly endorsed Lunny for ​citycouncil. If someone endorses a ​product, a ​statement saying the ​personlikes or uses the ​product is used in ​advertising the ​product.

endorse verb [T] (SIGN)

to write ​yourname on a ​check: He endorsed the ​check and ​deposited it in his ​account.
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "endorse" - British English Dictionary

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endorseverb [T]

uk   /ɪnˈdɔːs/  us   /-ˈdɔːrs/

endorse verb [T] (SUPPORT)

C2 to make a ​publicstatement of ​yourapproval or ​support for something or someone: The Council is ​expected to endorse the committee's ​recommendations.formal I ​fully endorse (= ​agree with) everything the Chairperson has said. to ​appear in an ​advertisement, saying that you use and like a ​particularproduct: They ​paid $2 million to the ​worldchampion to endorse ​their new ​aftershave.
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endorse verb [T] (GIVE PERMISSION)

to write something in ​order to give ​permission for something, ​especiallyyourname on the back of a cheque, in ​order to make it payable (= ​able to be ​paid) to someone ​else

endorse verb [T] (PUNISH)

UK to ​officiallyrecord on a driving licence that the ​driver has been ​foundguilty of ​driving in an ​illegal way
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "endorse" - Business English Dictionary

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endorseverb [T]

(US also indorse) uk   us   /ɪnˈdɔːs/
to ​statepublicly that you ​approve of or ​support someone or something: endorse a decision/plan/proposal Federal ​safetyregulators endorsed the company's decision to ​stopselling the ​product.be endorsed by sb/sth She has been endorsed by ​unions that ​represent nearly 4 million ​workersnationwide.endorse sb for sth The Commissioner praised the ​president and endorsed him for re-election. enthusiastically/​strongly/vigorously endorse
MARKETING to appear in an ​advertisement saying that you use and like a ​product: The league ​prohibitsplayers from endorsing ​productsrelated to alcohol, tobacco, ​casinos, or ​gambling.be endorsed by sb The new ​contemporarywomenswearrange - endorsed by well-known actress Tania Mitchell - was ​launched this autumn.
BANKING to ​sign the back of a ​cheque, bill of ​exchange, etc. that has your ​name on it in ​order to give ​permission for it to be ​paid to someone else: To endorse a ​cheque the ​originalpayee just has to ​sign the back of the ​cheque and ​state the ​name of the ​personconcerned.
INSURANCE to ​include a ​condition in an ​insuranceagreement: The ​insurer can be ​asked to endorse the ​insurancecertificate to ​confirm that ​driving in the ​performance of the employer's ​business is ​covered by the ​policy.
(Definition of endorse from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“endorse” in Business English

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