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Definition of “estimate” - English Dictionary

"estimate" in American English

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estimatenoun [C]

us   /ˈes·tə·mət/
a judgment or calculation of approximately how large or how great something is: I can only make a rough estimate (= an amount that is not exact) of how many people will attend.
An estimate is also a statement of the likely cost of building something or doing some other work.

estimateverb [T]

us   /ˈes·təˌmeɪt/
to guess the size, cost, etc., of something: We estimated his wealth at $500 million. [+ (that) clause] Doctors estimate (that) he has a 70 percent chance of recovering.
(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"estimate" in British English

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estimateverb [T]

uk   /ˈes.tɪ.meɪt/ us   /ˈes.tə.meɪt/
B2 to guess or calculate the cost, size, value, etc. of something: Government sources estimate a long-term 50 percent increase in rail fares. [+ (that)] They estimate (that) the journey will take at least two weeks. [+ question word] It was difficult to estimate how many trees had been destroyed.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

estimated
adjective uk   /ˈes.tɪ.meɪ.tɪd/ us   /ˈes.tə.meɪ.t̬ɪd/

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

B2 an estimated cost/value

estimatenoun [C]

uk   /ˈes.tɪ.mət/ us   /ˈes.tə.mət/
B2 a guess of what the size, value, amount, cost, etc. of something might be: The number of people who applied for the course was 120 compared with an initial estimate of between 50 and 100. We'll accept the lowest of three estimates for the building work. a conservative (= low) estimate a rough (= not exact) estimate

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"estimate" in Business English

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estimateverb [T]

uk   /ˈestɪmeɪt/ us  
to say what you believe the cost, size, value, etc. of something is, although you do not know for certain: estimate how much/many We should be able to estimate how many customers we will have each month. Several online calculators allow you to estimate your carbon emissions.estimate that sth Some analysts estimate that about a quarter of career-track hires in recent years have been women.estimate sth to be sth The knock-on economic benefit is estimated to be about 1200 jobs.estimate sth at sth Global oil reserves were estimated at 1,000 billion barrels.

estimatenoun [C]

uk   /ˈestɪmət/ us  
a guess as to what the size, value, amount, etc. of something might be: make/give/provide an estimate (of sth) Please provide an estimate of the increased cost for your business per annum. The estimates are based on a survey done in the early 1990s, so may no longer be accurate. The best estimate puts the total number of sales at about 1,000. a preliminary/initial/early estimaterough/accurate estimate At a rough estimate, three-quarters of the farms listed are working farms. a conservative/realistic/reasonable estimate
COMMERCE a statement for a possible customer about how much a piece of work should cost: give sb/provide/prepare an estimate He will compile the specifications, draw up plans, and prepare an estimate.ask for/obtain an estimate (for sth) We can offer advice on how to obtain estimates for minor repairs. If it is discovered that the cost will be greater than originally estimated, a revised estimate may then be sent to you.
(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“estimate” in Business English

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