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Definition of “exactly” - English Dictionary

"exactly" in American English

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exactlyadverb

us   /ɪɡˈzækt·li/
  • exactly adverb (ACCURATELY)

in a complete and correct way; not more or less than a particular number, time, etc.: We’ve come exactly 41 miles. Make sure you measure the window exactly, otherwise the shade won’t fit.
Exactly is sometimes used to increase emphasis: The businessmen who work in banking, she thought, all look exactly the same. You’re exactly right.
(Definition of exactly from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"exactly" in British English

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exactlyadverb

uk   /ɪɡˈzækt.li/ us   /ɪɡˈzækt.li/
A2 used when you are giving or asking for information that is completely correct: The journey took exactly three hours. That'll be £15 exactly, please. It tastes exactly the same as the real thing, but has half the fat. The building looks exactly as it did when it was built in 1877. "What you seem to be saying is that more should be invested in the road system and less in the railways." "Exactly" (= that is correct).
B1 used to emphasize what you are saying: Do exactly what I tell you and no one will get hurt! Exactly how do you propose to achieve this? What exactly do you mean?
not exactly
used for saying that someone or something is slightly different from a particular way of describing him, her, or it: He's not exactly good-looking, but he has a certain attraction.
B2 used for saying that something is not completely true: "So you gave her your iPod?" "Not exactly, I lent it to her."
used for saying that something is the opposite of a particular way of describing it: Answer the question - it's not exactly difficult.

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(Definition of exactly from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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