excess Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “excess” - English Dictionary

Definition of "excess" - American English Dictionary

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excessnoun [U]

 us   /ɪkˈses, ˈek·ses/
an ​amount that is more than ​acceptable, ​expected, or ​reasonable: They both ​eat to excess (= a lot more than they need). The company’s ​losses are in excess of (= more than) $5 million.
excessive
adjective  us   /ɪkˈses·ɪv/
We ​felt the ​charges were excessive.

excessadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ɪkˈses, ˈek·ses/
more than is ​necessary; too much: excess ​baggage
(Definition of excess from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "excess" - British English Dictionary

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excessnoun

uk   us   /ɪkˈses/ /ˈek.ses/

excess noun (TOO MUCH)

C1 [S or U] an ​amount that is more than ​acceptable, ​expected, or ​reasonable: An excess ofenthusiasm is not always a good thing. They both ​eat to excess (= too much). There will be an ​increase in ​tax for those ​earning in excess of (= more than)twice the ​nationalaveragewage.excesses [plural] actionsfar past the ​limit of what is ​acceptable: For many ​yearspeople were ​trying to ​escape the excesses (= ​cruelactions) of the ​junta. As for ​shoes, her excesses (= the ​largenumber she ​owned) were well ​known.
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excess noun (INSURANCE)

[U] UK (US deductible) a ​part of the ​cost of an ​accident, ​injury, etc. that you ​agree to ​pay yourself when you ​buy insurance: She has an excess of £200 on her ​homeinsurancepolicy.

excessadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ˈek.ses/
C1 extra: Cut off any excess ​pastry and put it to one ​side.
(Definition of excess from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "excess" - Business English Dictionary

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excessnoun

uk   us   /ɪkˈses/
[S or U] an ​amount that is more than is needed, expected, or acceptable: If you ​retire having ​saved more than £1.4m you will face a ​one-off 33% ​taxcharge on the excess. Any excess over these ​expensesrepresentsprofitattributable to ​shareholders.excess of sth There is still, in many ​industries, an excess of ​productivecapacity.
[S] UK (US deductible) INSURANCE a ​part of the ​cost of an accident, ​injury, etc. that you ​agree to ​pay yourself when you ​buyinsurance: Cover would ​cost £239 a ​year with a £75 excess, or £215 a ​year with a £250 excess. excess on sth The ​policycarries a £40 excess on most ​claims.
in excess of more than: Last ​year he ​earned in excess of $3 million. The Fund will not ​borrowmoney in excess of one-third of the ​value of its ​netassets.

excessadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /ɪkˈses/
more than is needed, expected, or acceptable: Rents may be ​lower than ​ownershipcosts, ​meaningrenters can ​invest the excess ​cash. The ​machine can ​generate electricity using excess ​heat that would otherwise be ​wasted.
(Definition of excess from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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